How Many Calories Is Sushi?

Sushi Calories and Nutritional Information

roll name caloriesper roll carbsgrams per roll
Basic Sushi Rolls (estimated per entire roll, not each piece)1
Avocado Roll 140 28
California Roll 255 38
Kappa Maki (cucumber roll) 136 30

Is sushi low-calorie?

Sushi topped with a bit of seafood like a fish fillet only contains about 40-65 calories per piece, so it’s a portion of good low-calorie food. Thus, if you eat a whole roll you can feel full and avoid packing in many calories.

What is the lowest calorie sushi roll at subway?

The Avocado Sushi Roll contains the lowest amount of calories because it is one of the simplest rolls to order. An avocado roll contains 140 calories, 5.7 grams of fat, 28 grams of carbohydrates and 2.1 grams of protein. This roll is light and for those averse to fish.

How many pieces of sushi should you eat per meal?

Never eat more than 6-8 pieces per meal. Sushi topped with a bit of seafood like a fish fillet only contains about 40-65 calories per piece, so it’s a portion of good low-calorie food. So if you eat a whole roll, you can feel full and avoid packing in too many calories!

Is Sushi good for losing weight?

Sushi is often regarded as a weight-loss-friendly meal. Yet, many types of sushi are made with high-fat sauces and fried tempura batter, which significantly increases their calorie content. Additionally, a single piece of sushi generally contains very small amounts of fish or vegetables.

How many calories is 1 roll of Sushi?

Your typical 6-piece sushi roll contains between 200-250 calories. Sushi maki rolls with fish, vegetables and without extra sauces have the lowest calorie count, like the avocado roll. Sushi rolls with fried tempura batter or lots of extra fillings and sauces like the rainbow roll have the highest calorie count.

How many calories are in 8 pieces of Sushi?

There are 297 calories in 8 pieces of Sushi.

Is Sushi a lot of calories?

One of the biggest problems with sushi is portion control. While it may look compact, sushi can have a lot of calories: a single sushi roll cut into six to nine pieces can contain as many as 500 calories, says Isabel Maples, a registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

How many calories are in 12 pieces of sushi?

There are 446 calories in 12 pieces of Sushi.

Can sushi make you gain weight?

Sushi. While it seems innocent, a sushi dinner with two shrimp tempura rolls — about 12 pieces of sushi — quickly adds more than 1,000 calories and 42 grams of fat to your day’s intake. Considering that 1 pound of fat is 3,500 calories, eating sushi regularly can easily cause weight gain.

How many calories is 100 pieces of Sushi?

There are 3770 calories in 100 pieces of Sushi with Vegetables.

Other common serving sizes.

Serving Size Calories
100 g 145
1 cup 241

How many calories are in 6 pieces of Sushi?

There are 223 calories in 6 pieces of Sushi.

How many calories are in 30 pieces of Sushi?

There are 1115 calories in 30 pieces of Sushi.

How many calories are in 16 pieces of sushi?

There are 595 calories in 16 pieces of Sushi.

How many calories are in a 12 piece California roll?

There are 394 calories in 12 California Rolls.

Are sushi rolls healthy?

Sushi can be a healthy choice, but it depends on the variety you order. Oily fish such as salmon and tuna contain omega-3, which is an essential fatty acid. The World Health Organisation recommends eating 1-2 portions of oily fish a week, so sushi can be a delicious way to reach these targets.

How many calories is 10 pieces of sushi?

There are 372 calories in 10 pieces of Sushi.

How many calories are in 20 pieces of sushi?

There are 744 calories in 20 pieces of Sushi.

What sushi has the lowest calories?

The lowest calorie maki rolls are those with veggies or fish without additional sauces or mayo such as tuna or cucumber rolls which contain fewer than 200 calories for 6 pieces. Rolls like salmon avocado or spicy tuna clock in around 300 calories per roll. There are “traditional” vs “special” sushi rolls.

Sushi Calories and Nutritional Information

  • Fortunately, sushi is not a very fatty cuisine, and if you have a taste for sushi, a low-calorie lunch is not out of the question.
  • While sushi rice includes a significant quantity of carbs, sushi may also be eaten without rice (as sashimi), and when consumed in moderation, even a regular sushi dish can be a nutritious treat without breaking the wallet.
  • In this part, we discuss the calorie content of sushi as well as the nutritional values of typical sushi products that you are likely to encounter throughout your sushi eating trips.
  • We’ve gathered information on nigiri sushi (finger sushi), maki sushi (rolls), sashimi, side dishes that you could find in a Japanese restaurant, and even products that are widely purchased at grocery shops such as Whole Foods, to help you make the best sushi possible.
  • We trust that this information will assist you in making well-informed judgments.

If you are seeking for information on the calories in sushi, we hope that these tables may be of use.Because sushi is a hand-crafted dish, we remind our readers that a comparable sushi item created by two different sushi chefs may have different proportions of components, and hence varied nutritional values in terms of calorie intake, fat intake, carbohydrate intake, and protein intake.Restaurants may also add additional ingredients to some rolls, such as mayonnaise, which will raise their calorie contents above and beyond our baseline statistics.

In any case, the information in this part should provide you with a decent idea of the calorie and nutritional content of various sushi products, allowing you to make an informed decision on the weight loss benefits of lean protein, as well as the benefits of sushi in general.Please keep in mind that we at The Sushi FAQ are not nutritionists or dietitians, and we do not provide nutritional advice.For the sake of providing our readers with a single source of precise figures, we have only combined data from official sources (such as the USDA) and data from restaurants and stores.We’ve included projected Weight Watchers points for sushi products (which are normally rounded to the closest half point) based on the nutritional values supplied, in response to popular demand for a Weight Watchers PointsPlus list.

Meshi agare, agare, agare, agare!

Your Favorite Sushi Rolls Ranked by Calorie Count

  • Sushi is a dish that everybody may enjoy.
  • Going out to sushi is nearly a national hobby in the United States.
  • However, there are so many different sushi rolls to chose from that I am never sure which one to have.
  • Which sushi roll do I want: the spicy tuna roll or the rainbow sushi roll?
  • Which is better, the spider roll or the California roll?

This prompted me to ponder which sushi roll is the healthiest and which one contains the least amount of calories.As a starting point, I’ve rated the most popular sushi rolls so that you may learn to make them yourself.Truth hurts when it comes to the excessively calorie-dense sushi rolls; however, a good sushi roll and a good time are sometimes well worth it.

11. The Shrimp Tempura Roll

  • Tatiana Olivier captured this image.
  • The Shrimp Tempura Roll has the highest calorie count because the shrimp is breaded and deep-fried, imparting a crisp and delicious taste to the shrimp.
  • It has 508 calories, 21 grams of fat, 64 grams of carbs, and 20 grams of protein per serving.
  • Despite the fact that this sushi has the greatest number of calories, it is requested by people who are the most courageous and fearless sushi enthusiasts.

10. Rainbow Roll

  • Rebecca Block captured this image.
  • It’s for individuals who like a little bit of everything, and the Rainbow Roll is it.
  • 476 calories, 16 grams of fat, 50 grams of carbs, and 33 grams of protein are contained within this serving.
  • This sushi roll is distinguished by the variety of fish that is placed on top, making it one of the most diversified and protein-dense rolls available.
  • And, despite the fact that it is heavy in calories, it is a visually appealing dinner.

9. Eel Avocado Roll

  • The image is from of food.com.
  • Eel is a chewy fish that is one of the fattier fishes that may be utilized in sushi.
  • There are 372 calories in the Eel Avocado Roll, along with 17 grams of fat, 31 grams of carbs, and 20 grams of protein.
  • Despite the fact that this roll is full with protein, it demands a sophisticated sushi palate to enjoy it since the flavor is not for the faint of heart for everyone.

8. Caterpillar Roll

  • Food.com provided the image.
  • In sushi, eel has a chewy texture and is one of the fattier fishes utilized because of its size.
  • Three hundred and seventy-two calories, seventeen grams of fat, thirty-nine grams of carbs, and twenty grams of protein comprise the Eel Avocado Roll.
  • Despite the fact that this roll is full with protein, it takes a sophisticated sushi palate to enjoy it because the flavor is not for all tastes.

7. Philadelphia Roll

The image is from of food.com. The Philadelphia Roll has salmon and cream cheese, making it one of the more calorie-dense sushi rolls available. 320 calories, 8 grams of fat, 32 carbohydrate grams, and 8 grams of protein are included in this dish. When it comes to ordering comfort food, this is one of the better options available, especially if you enjoy the cream cheese flavor with fish.

6. Spider Roll

Nicolle Luftman provided the photograph. It is mostly comprised of battered crab, which adds taste and calories to what would otherwise be a plain bun. There are 317 calories in it, as well as 12 grams of fat, 38 grams of carbs, and 13 grams of protein. However, even if the crab is fried in this recipe, it is still a very popular and excellent roll.

5. Salmon Avocado Roll

Christal Schmid provided the photograph. Several health advantages may be found in the Salmon Avocado Roll. There are 304 calories in this sushi roll along with 8.4 grams of fat, 42 grams of carbs, and 13 grams of protein. It is beneficial due to the presence of omega 3 fatty acids and good fats.

4. Spicy Tuna Roll

Featured image courtesy of mysushidaddy.com The Spicy Tuna Roll is a variation on the traditional tuna roll, with additional heat and flair. It includes 290 calories, 11 grams of fat, 26 grams of carbs, and 24 grams of protein in a serving size of 1 cup. Green onions, spicy sauce, and mayonnaise are combined to create a tasty ″spice″ that is high in nutrients and low in calories.

See also:  How Much Does A Large Pizza Cost At Papa Johns?

3. California Roll

Courtesy of Japanesecooking101.com, used with permission. The California Roll is a traditional dish in the United States. A serving of this dish has 225 calories, 7 grams of fat, 28 carbohydrate grams, and 9 grams of protein grams. It is the ideal roll for those looking for a light dinner or for those who are eating sushi for the first time.

2. Tuna Roll

Hayden Carder captured this image. With the addition of protein, the Tuna Roll is also incredibly simple to make. 184 calories, 2 grams of fat, 27 grams of carbs, and 24 grams of protein are contained within this serving size. When made without the ″spicy″ tuna component, this roll is a fantastic choice for lighter seafood.

1. Avocado Roll

The image is from of food.com. Because it is one of the simplest rolls to prepare, the Avocado Sushi Roll has the fewest calories of all the rolls. In a single serving of an avocado roll, 140 calories are provided, along with 5.7 grams of fat, 28 grams of carbs, and 2.1 grams of protein. This roll is light and suitable for folks who are not fond of fish.

How Many Calories Are in Your Favorite Sushi Rolls?

    The California roll is a popular type of sushi made with cucumber, avocado, and cooked imitation crab, all wrapped in nori (2).Also called surimi, imitation crab is made from a type of fish called pollock. Because pollock is low in mercury, the California roll is a safer option for those who are pregnant but still want to enjoy sushi (3).Because imitation crab is precooked, this roll is also a great option for those who want to try sushi but are wary of eating raw fish.Two to three pieces (100 grams) contain (2):

  • Calories: 93
  • Protein: 2.9 grams
  • Carbs: 18.4 grams
  • Fat: 0.7 grams
  • Sodium: 428 mg, or around 18% of the Daily Value (DV)

Spicy tuna and salmon rolls

    These rolls are made with white rice with vinegar, avocado, cucumber, sesame seeds, and a chili sauce that adds a kick of flavor and spice.They contain either raw tuna or salmon. In Japanese, raw fish is called sashimi.Two to three pieces (100 grams) of spicy tuna roll contain (4):

  • Calories: 175
  • Protein: 7.5 grams
  • Carbs: 16.7 grams
  • Fat: 7.5 grams
  • Sodium: 217 mg, or 9% of the DV
    Two to three pieces (100 grams) of spicy salmon roll contain (5):

  • Calories: 190
  • Protein: 6 grams
  • Carbs: 24 grams
  • Fat: 6 grams
  • Sodium: 330 mg, or 13.6% of the DV

Shrimp tempura roll

    “Tempura” is a Japanese term that indicates that a food — seafood, meat, or vegetables — is lightly battered and deep-fried.For this roll, shrimp is dipped in a batter of flour, eggs, and breadcrumbs; deep-fried; and served with an accompanying tempura sauce made of soy sauce, sugar, and a type of rice wine called mirin.Shrimp tempura is another great sushi option if you prefer cooked seafood to raw or prefer crispy textures.Two to three pieces (100 grams) of shrimp tempura contain (6):

  • Calories: 175
  • Protein: 3.7 grams
  • Carbs: 28 grams
  • Fat: 5.9 grams
  • Sodium: 421 mg, or 17% of the DV

Avocado roll

    Although sushi is best known as a dish that contains raw fish, there are many varieties to choose from, including vegetarian options.The avocado roll is a vegetarian sushi dish made with avocado, pickled ginger, sesame seeds, and wasabi — a spicy horseradish paste — wrapped in seaweed (7).Two to three pieces of avocado roll (100 grams) contain (7):

  • Calories: 140
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Carbs: 24.8 grams
  • Fat: 3.7 grams
  • Sodium: 483 mg, or 20% of the DV

Rainbow roll

    The rainbow roll can be considered a more adventurous sushi dish, as it combines imitation crab with raw seafood like tuna, salmon, tilapia, or shrimp.It also contains avocado, cucumber, mayonnaise, and sesame seeds, all wrapped in seaweed and served with wasabi, pickled ginger, and soy sauce.Two to three pieces (100 grams) of rainbow roll contain (8):

  • Calories: 146
  • Protein: 7.3 grams
  • Carbs: 17 grams
  • Fat: 5.7 grams
  • Sodium: 301 mg, or 12.5% of the DV

Philadelphia roll

    Another popular sushi dish is the Philadelphia roll. It’s made with smoked salmon, cream cheese, dill, sesame seeds, pretzel salt, and cucumber (9).Two to three pieces (100 grams) of Philadelphia roll contain (9):

  • Calories: 170
  • Protein: 7 grams
  • Carbs: 20.5 grams
  • Fat: 6.5 grams
  • Sodium: 285 mg, or around 12% of the DV

Salmon avocado roll

    This roll is made with raw salmon.Mashed avocado is rolled up with raw salmon, white rice, sushi vinegar, avocado, pickled ginger, sesame seeds, seaweed, and lettuce (10).Two to three pieces (100 grams) of salmon avocado roll contain (10):

  • Calories: 179
  • Protein: 5.8 grams
  • Carbs: 30 grams
  • Fat: 4.6 grams
  • Sodium: 357 mg, or around 15% of the DV

Dragon roll

    There are several varieties of dragon roll sushi, including vegetarian options and versions made with eel.Other ingredients can include imitation crab, tempura shrimp, avocado, cucumber, mayonnaise, and an unagi sauce made with soy sauce, sugar, and caramel color (11).There is a notable difference in ingredients and calories between packaged dragon roll sushi and freshly made versions from a restaurant. For the most accurate information, make sure to read any available nutrition tables on restaurant menus or product packages.Generally, 100 grams (2 to 3 pieces) of prepackaged dragon roll sushi with eel and imitation crab may contain (11):

  • Calories: 175
  • Protein: 4.8 grams
  • Carbs: 20.6 grams
  • Fat: 7.9 grams
  • Sodium: 397 mg, or 16.5% of the DV

Cucumber roll

    The cucumber sushi roll is made with raw tuna, imitation crab, avocado, and radish sprouts (12).It features a variety of sauces, including spicy chili sauce, a blend of burdock and soy sauce known as gobo, and a type of soy sauce called ponzu (12).Two to three pieces (100 grams) of cucumber roll contain (12):

  • Calories: 78
  • Protein: 4 grams
  • Carbs: 5 grams
  • Fat: 5 grams
  • Sodium: 319 mg, or 13.3% of the DV

Spider roll

  • This form of prepared sushi is constructed with tempura soft-shell crab and spicy mayonnaise that is wrapped in vinegared rice and nori seaweed to create the spider roll. Half of a spider roll (about 100 grams) comprises (13) of the following ingredients: 214 calories per serving
  • Protein is 6.5 grams, carbohydrates are 16.5 grams, and fat is 13.5 grams.
  • Sodium: 373 mg, which is 16 percent of the daily value

Sashimi

    Sashimi is rice-free sushi. It consists of thinly sliced raw fish served with wasabi and soy sauce. The most common sashimi types are raw tuna and salmon.Given that this type of sushi is neither fried nor served with high fat ingredients like mayonnaise or cream cheese, it’s lower in calories and carbs than most other types.For instance, 100 grams of salmon sashimi contains (14):

  • Calories: 127
  • Protein: 20.5 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 4.4 grams
  • Sodium: 75 mg, or 3.2% of the DV

Nigiri

  • Nigiri is a form of sushi that is not rolled like traditional sushi. Instead, it’s presented as a thin slice of raw fish on top of a little bed of rice, which is a more traditional presentation. Pickled ginger is typically served on top of the fish, which is accompanied with a little slice of wasabi between the rice and the fish. Alternatively, cooked shrimp or eel can be substituted for raw fish in other forms of nigiri. Nigiri, like sashimi, has less calories per serving than many other forms of sushi. One hundred grams (two pieces) of tuna nigiri contains (15) of the following nutrients: 117 calories
  • 15 grams of protein
  • 12 grams of carbohydrates
  • 0.4 grams of fat
  • 26 milligrams of sodium, or 1.1 percent of the daily value
    Traditional Japanese sushi dishes contain minimal ingredients and are generally low in calories.However, popular westernized adaptations of sushi often have high fat ingredients and sauces that make them higher in calories.Further, regardless of the type of sushi you choose, using lots of soy sauce for serving introduces high amounts of sodium. This can be a concern, especially for people with high blood pressure (16). Here are some simple ways to make your next sushi night healthier:

  • Choose alternative grains. Though these options are not as popular, some restaurants offer sushi made with brown rice or quinoa instead of white rice. This can boost the fiber and nutrition content of your meal.
  • Go rice-free. Sashimi is a rice-free, low calorie option. If raw fish is not a deterrent for you, this may be the healthiest choice.
  • Get soy sauce on the side. Soy sauce is high in sodium, and excess sodium intake in linked to high blood pressure and heart disease. Instead of covering your sushi in soy sauce, keep the sauce on the side and lightly dip for some flavor (16).
  • Choose low fat. Tempura sushi and sushi made with mayonnaise and cream cheese are higher in calories. You can opt to have these less often than lower fat alternatives.
  • Focus on sides. Sushi is often served with sides like pickled ginger, wasabi, miso soup, and edamame beans. Explore various tastes and textures with these sides, and don’t rely only on soy sauce for flavor.
  • Choose fresh whenever possible. Freshly made sushi often has fewer ingredients than packaged sushi. For example, packaged types often contain additives to improve their quality and safety and prolong their shelf life.
  • Raw and cooked fish, veggies, rice, and seaweed are used in the preparation of sushi, which is a famous Japanese cuisine.
  • Although traditional Japanese sushi is made with only a few ingredients and has a low calorie count, many of the dishes that have been adapted to include high-fat foods and consequently have a higher calorie count.
  • Sushi has between 93 and 190 calories per 100 grams (usually equal to 2 to 3 pieces), with vegetarian, rice-free, and non-fried versions having the lowest calorie counts.
  • Sushi is high in protein and low in fat.
  • Sodium should be taken into consideration in addition to fat and calorie levels to ensure that your daily sodium consumption remains below recommended limits.

Calories in Sushi

Food database and calorie counter The favorite choice for the term ″Sushi″ is 1 piece of Sushi which has about 37 calories. Calorie and nutritional information for a variety of types and serving sizes of Sushi is shown below. View other nutritional values (such as Carbs or Fats) using the filter below: Calories|Total Carbs|Total Fats|Protein|Sodium|Cholesterol|Vitamins

Popular Types of Sushi

(1 piece serving)
Fat(g) Carbs(g) Prot(g) Calories
Regular Sushi 0.11 7.77 1.12 37
California Roll 0.12 6.31 1.38 33
Philadelphia Roll 1.31 5.90 1.09 41
Sushi with Egg 1.33 3.34 1.49 32
Sushi with Vegetables 0.07 8.24 0.80 38
Sushi with Vegetables and Seafood 0.11 7.15 1.40 36
Sushi with Vegetables Rolled in Seaweed 0.06 6.71 0.57 31

Popular Maki Rolls

(1 piece serving)
Fat(g) Carbs(g) Prot(g) Calories
Salmon Maki 0.23 4.92 1.12 28
Cucumber Maki 0.04 5.04 0.41 23
Tuna Maki 0.07 4.92 1.17 26
Avocado Maki 0.52 5.21 0.46 28

Popular Types of Sashimi

(1 piece serving)
Fat(g) Carbs(g) Prot(g) Calories
Salmon Sashimi 1.68 6.13 41
Tuna Sashimi 0.27 6.63 31
Yellowtail Sashimi 1.49 6.56 41

Other Types of Sushi

Fat(g) Carbs(g) Prot(g) Calories

Sushi Pieces (1 piece serving)

Salmon 0.36 9.00 1.85 48
Tuna 0.12 9.16 1.94 46
Tilapia 1.00 8.00 2.00 49
Sea Eel 3.00 11.00 4.00 90
Smoked Salmon 1.00 9.00 5.00 68
Octopus 1.00 9.00 2.00 57

Sushi Rolls (1 roll serving)

California Roll 6.00 66.00 10.00 361
Rainbow Roll 9.00 66.00 31.00 489
Tempura Roll 11.00 82.00 25.00 531
Tofu Roll 3.00 62.00 11.00 321
Dragon Roll 18.00 66.00 18.00 507
Spicy Tuna Roll 11.00 26.00 24.00 290
Spicy Salmon Roll 16.00 59.00 25.00 485
Spicy Shrimp Roll 11.00 57.00 19.00 397
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Sushi Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 1 piece
  • Calories in a single serving of food Daily Values are 37% of the total.
  • * Total fat 0.11g 0 percent saturated fat 0.023g Total fat 0.11g 0 percent saturated fat No Trans Fat – Polyunsaturated Fat 0.033g Monounsaturated Fat 0.033g 0 percent Trans Fat Cholesterol (cholesterol monohydrate) 1 mg 0 percent sodium (155 milligrams) 7.77 g of total carbohydrate (7 percent).
  • dietary fiber (0.2g) 3 % of total calories 1 percent of the calories come from sugar.
  • Vitamin D (calcium 5mg) 1.63g Protein 1.12g Calcium 0 percent Iron 0.35 milligrams Potassium (potassium chloride) 34 mg 12 micrograms of Vitamin A in 1 percent of the total 1 percent Vitamin C 0.5 mg 1 percent Vitamin C * The percent Daily Value (DV) of a nutrient in a portion of food indicates how much that nutrient contributes to a person’s daily diet.
  • For general nutrition guidance, 2,000 calories per day is recommended.

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  • Please remember that some foods may not be suitable for all people, and you should consult with your doctor before beginning any weight loss effort or diet regimen.Although the information provided on this site is presented in good faith and believes to be correct, FatSecret makes no representations or warranties as to its completeness or accuracy, and you use all information, including nutritional values, at your own risk.All trademarks, copyright, and other intellectual property rights are reserved.

How Many Calories Are In Sushi?

  • The temptation to get your hands on an enticingly gorgeous roll when the mood strikes you is almost too much to bear.
  • The astonishing appearances of Japanese food across the world, which can be found in every corner, might be a delectable longing that may cause you to abandon your diet for a short while.
  • You can purchase it in a limitless range of flavors, and there are alternatives for all various sorts of palates, whether you’re a fan of seafood or vegetarian cuisine.
  • The high calorie and carbohydrate content of sushi, on the other hand, is a source of concern for those following a healthy diet.
  • Conscious minds are incredibly tenacious when it comes to their diets, and for good reason: eating well maintains your mind, body, and spirit in harmony.

The topic of whether or not sushi is a healthy addition to one’s diet does arise as a result, don’t you think?

Is it healthy to eat sushi?

  1. While most nutritionists agree that sushi is a healthy option to include in one’s diet because of the nutritional richness of the fish and vegetables used, the question of ″how healthy″ truly relies on the products used and the varied preparation techniques employed.
  2. Yes, sushi is considered to be healthful, according to the first response.
  3. It’s filling and tasty at the same time.
  4. Nevertheless, the source from which you obtain them may alter this assertion.
  1. Sushi that is high in protein, such as tuna or salmon, which both contain significant levels of omega 3, is necessary for it to give a significant number of nutrients.
  2. A fantastic choice for veggies when they are the major component of a roll is those that are increased in vitamin C and vitamin K as well as beneficial fibers and iodine found in greens such as cucumber and avocado.
  3. Choosing sushi served with high-calorie sauces, such as those created with mayonnaise, will result in the less healthful variants of the dish, which includes the much-loved Japanese phenomenon known as tempura.
  4. Being cautious with fried foods is essential.
  5. This is especially true if you’re in the mood for a tasty treat.
  6. Of course, this does not mean that you should avoid fried foods altogether, since they are rather tasty anyway.

How many calories are in sushi?

  1. As a result of the nutritional qualities in fish and vegetables, most experts agree that sushi is a healthy option to include in one’s diet.
  2. However, how nutritious sushi is relies on the items used as well as how it was prepared.
  3. Yes, sushi is considered to be healthful, according to the first response..
  4. Besides being healthy, it’s also tasty.
  1. It is possible, however, that the source of your supplies will alter this statement.
  2. Sushi that is high in protein, such as tuna or salmon, which both contain significant levels of omega 3, is necessary for it to deliver a significant amount of nutritional value.
  3. Cucumber and avocado are excellent choices when veggies are the primary component of a roll since they are high in vitamin C and vitamin K, as well as beneficial fibers and iodine.
  4. Choosing sushi served with high-calorie sauces, such as those created with mayonnaise, would result in less healthful versions of the dish, which includes the much-loved Japanese phenomena known as tempura, of course.
  5. Being cautious with fried foods is essential.
  6. This is especially true if you’re in the mood for a tasty treat.

Of course, this does not mean that you should avoid fried foods altogether, since they are rather tasty.

Lowest calories sushi rolls

  • Sushi selections with the fewest calories are listed below, so you may incorporate them into your diet on a regular basis, if you so want. A common tip to remember is that you should not eat more than 8-12 pieces of sushi every meal in order to retain sushi as a healthy meal. When it comes to sushi rolls, these are some of the most popular selections available at practically any sushi restaurant, so keep an eye out for them if you find yourself in a restaurant with some of your best friends unexpectedly: The Sashimi Platter, the Salmon Avocado Roll, the Tuna tartare or other raw Tuna alternatives, the Cucumber Makis, and the California Roll are all excellent choices.
  1. Keep in mind, however, that those sushi photographs on the menu that appear to be adorned with elaborate, vibrant sauces may really contain more calories than you realize!
  2. As a general rule, it is better to confirm with the chef or your waitress and ask for advice that will not cause you to stray too far from your diet restrictions.
  3. We also recommend that you use applications available through your phone’s app stores to keep track of your nutritional and calorie intake.
  4. These applications not only contain detailed information about most sushi, but also almost any other dish you might be craving, making it much easier to keep track of your intake.
  1. As one of the best examples that our colleagues have advised, My Fitness Pal is a program that allows you to manage your meals exactly the way you want them to be managed.
  2. Of course, there are a plethora of alternatives available for healthy diets, and you’ll be pleased to hear that sushi is included in that list as well.
  3. There’s no excuse not to indulge in a delectable Japanese dinner, especially when it’s accompanied by a hearty bowl of miso soup that is packed with nutrients.
  4. Whenever you decide to come to Kae, we will provide you with a variety of choices, including healthy options, indulgent options, and options that fit both categories while maintaining sufficient nutritional value and low calorie counts to provide the most balanced addition to your diet that we possibly can.
  5. Because of the starch-filled carbs found in sushi rice, some people are concerned about eating it.
  6. We can promise you that we utilize a 100% gluten-free alternative, which makes it a light and delightful addition that won’t leave you feeling bloated.

Poke bowls, salads, and soups are also available for those on a more restrictive diet!

Sushi: Healthy or Unhealthy?

Fish

Fish is a good source of protein, iodine, and multiple vitamins and minerals.In addition, it’s one of the few foods that naturally contain vitamin D (2).What’s more, fish contains omega-3 fats, which your brain and body need to function optimally. These fats help fight medical conditions like heart disease and stroke (3, 4, 5).Fish is also linked to a lower risk of certain autoimmune diseases, depression, and loss of memory and vision in old age (6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Wasabi

Wasabi paste is often served alongside sushi. As its flavor is very strong, it’s only eaten in small amounts.It is made from the grated stem of Eutrema japonicum, which belongs to the same family as cabbage, horseradish, and mustard.Wasabi is rich in beta carotene, glucosinolates, and isothiocyanates. Research shows that these compounds may have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties (11, 12, 13, 14).However, due to the wasabi plant’s scarcity, many restaurants use an imitation paste made from a combination of horseradish, mustard powder, and green dye. This product is unlikely to have the same nutritional properties.

Seaweed

  1. Nori is a kind of seaweed that is used to make sushi rolls.
  2. It includes a variety of minerals, including calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, salt, iodine, thiamine, and vitamins A, C, and E.
  3. It also contains a number of antioxidants, including vitamin E.
  4. (15).
  1. Furthermore, protein accounts for 44 percent of its dry weight, which is comparable to high-protein plant foods such as soybeans and lentils (16, 17).
  2. However, because one roll of sushi contains relatively little seaweed, it is unlikely to supply a significant amount of nutrients to meet your daily nutritional requirements.
  3. Nori may also include substances that can be used to fight infections, inflammation, and cancer, among other things.
  4. However, the concentrations of these chemicals are most likely too low to have any significant health consequences (18).

Pickled ginger

    Sweet, pickled ginger, also known as gari, is often used to cleanse your palate between different pieces of sushi.Ginger is a good source of potassium, magnesium, copper, and manganese (20).In addition, it may have certain properties that help protect against bacteria and viruses (21, 22).Studies further show that ginger may improve memory and help reduce nausea, muscle pain, arthritic pain, menstrual pain, and even LDL (bad) cholesterol levels (23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28).SUMMARY Sushi contains various healthy and nutrient-rich ingredients, such as fish, wasabi, seaweed, and pickled ginger. The main component of sushi is white rice, which has been refined and stripped of almost all fiber, vitamins, and minerals.Some studies suggest that a high intake of refined carbs and the associated rise in blood sugar levels may promote inflammation and increase your risk of diabetes and heart disease (29, 30, 31).What’s more, sushi rice is often prepared with sugar. The added sugar and low fiber content mean that sushi’s carbs are broken down quickly in your digestive system.This can lead to a spike in blood sugar and insulin levels, which may contribute to overeating (32, 33).However, studies also suggest that the rice vinegar added to sushi may help lower blood sugar, blood pressure, and blood fats (34).Asking for your sushi to be prepared with brown rice instead of white rice can increase its fiber content and nutritional value.You can also request that your rolls be prepared with less rice and more vegetables to further increase the nutrient content.SUMMARY Sushi contains a large number of refined carbs. This can make you more likely to overeat and may increase your risk of inflammation, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Sushi is often regarded as a weight-loss-friendly meal.Yet, many types of sushi are made with high-fat sauces and fried tempura batter, which significantly increases their calorie content.Additionally, a single piece of sushi generally contains very small amounts of fish or vegetables. This makes it a low-protein, low-fiber meal and thus not very effective at reducing hunger and appetite (35, 36).To make your next sushi meal more filling, try accompanying it with miso soup, edamame, sashimi, or wakame salad.SUMMARY Sushi often boasts high-fat sauces and toppings but relatively small amounts of vegetables or fish. The lack of protein and fiber can easily turn it into a high-calorie meal that’s unlikely to make you feel full. A sushi meal generally contains a large amount of salt.First, the rice used to make it is often cooked with salt. In addition, the smoked fish and pickled veggies also harbor salt.Finally, it’s usually served with soy sauce, which is very high in salt.Too much salt in your diet may increase your risk of stomach cancer. It may also promote high blood pressure in people who are sensitive to this ingredient (37, 38, 39).If you want to reduce your salt intake, you should minimize or avoid soy sauce, as well as sushi prepared with smoked fish, such as mackerel or salmon.Although miso soup may help prevent you from overeating, it contains a lot of salt. If you’re watching your salt intake, you may want to avoid it as well.SUMMARY Sushi can pack a large amount of salt, which may increase your risk of stomach cancer and promote high blood pressure in some people. Eating sushi made with raw fish may put you at risk of infection from various bacteria and parasites (40, 41, 42, 43).Some of the species most often found in sushi include Salmonella, various Vibrio bacteria, and Anisakis and Diphyllobothrium parasites (44, 45, 46, 47).It’s important to note that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not currently regulate the use of the “sushi-grade fish” label. As such, this label does not guarantee that the sushi you are eating is safe.The only current regulation is that certain fish should be frozen to kill any parasites before being served raw.One recent study examined the raw fish used in 23 Portuguese restaurants and found that 64% of the samples were contaminated with harmful microorganisms (48).However, proper food processing and handling procedures can reduce the risk of contamination (49, 50).To reduce your risk of food poisoning, aim to eat sushi at reputable restaurants that are more likely to follow proper food safety practices. You can also opt for vegetarian rolls or ones made with cooked fish.Some people — including pregnant women, young children, older adults, and those with weakened immune systems — may need to completely avoid sushi made with raw fish.SUMMARY Sushi made with raw fish may contain harmful bacteria and parasites. Improper food processing and handling increase your risk of contamination. Fish may also contain heavy metals like mercury due to oceanic pollution.Predatory fish, such as tuna, swordfish, mackerel, marlin, and shark, tend to have the highest levels.Seafood species that are low in mercury include salmon, eel, sea urchin, trout, crab, and octopus (51).Other types of toxins found in fish can lead to ciguatera or scombroid poisoning (52).Sea bass, grouper, and red snapper are the most likely to lead to ciguatera poisoning, whereas scombroid poisoning is most likely to result from eating tuna, mackerel, or mahi-mahi (52).You can reduce your risk by avoiding the types of fish most likely to be contaminated.SUMMARY Certain types of fish are likelier to be contaminated with toxins, including mercury. To get the most health benefits out of sushi, follow these simple guidelines:

  • Increase your nutrient intake. Choose sushi rolls made with brown rice over those made with white rice.
  • Favor cone-shaped hand rolls (temaki), which contain less rice than more traditional rolls.
  • Increase the protein and fiber content of your meal. Accompany your sushi with edamame, wakame salad, miso soup, or sashimi.
  • Avoid rolls made with cream cheese, sauces, or tempura. To create crunchiness without these unhealthy ingredients, ask for extra vegetables.
  • Cut down on soy sauce. If you are salt-sensitive, avoid soy sauce or only lightly dip your sushi in it.
  • Order sushi from reputable restaurants, which are more likely to follow proper food safety practices.
  1. SUMMARY There are a variety of approaches that may be used to maximize the health advantages of sushi while limiting its possible negative effects.
  2. Sushi is a Japanese roll comprised of rice, seaweed, veggies, and raw or cooked fish.
  3. Sushi is a popular dish in Japan.
  4. It has a high concentration of vitamins, minerals, and health-promoting substances.
  1. Some varieties, on the other hand, are heavy in processed carbohydrates, salt, and harmful fats.
  2. Sushi, on the other hand, may be a healthy supplement to a well-balanced diet if eaten in moderation and in moderation only.

Calories in 1 piece of Sushi and Nutrition Facts

Food database and calorie counter Source: Generic
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 piece
  1. Calories in a single serving of food Daily Values are 37% of the total.
  2. * Total Fat 0.11g 0 percent Saturated Fat 0.023g 0 percent Trans Fat – Polyunsaturated Fat 0.033g Monounsaturated Fat 0.033g Total Fat 0.11g 0 percent Saturated Fat 0.023g 0 percent Trans Fat Cholesterol (cholesterol monohydrate) 1 mg 0 percent sodium (155 milligrams) 7.77 g of total carbohydrate (7 percent).
  3. dietary fiber (0.2g) 3 % of total calories 1 percent of the calories come from sugar.
  4. 1.63g Protein 1.12g Carbohydrates Calcium 5mg – Vitamin D 5mg 0 percent Iron 0.35 milligrams Potassium (potassium chloride) 34 mg 12 micrograms of Vitamin A in 1 percent of the total 1 percent Vitamin C 0.5 mg 1 percent Vitamin C * The percent Daily Value (DV) of a nutrient in a portion of food indicates how much that nutrient contributes to a person’s daily diet.
  1. For general nutrition guidance, 2,000 calories per day is recommended.
  2. The most recent update was made on August 21, 2007, at 07:33 a.m.
  3. FatSecret Platform API is the source of this information.
2% of RDI* (37 calories)
Calorie Breakdown: Carbohydrate (85%)Fat (3%)Protein (12%)

The following calculations were made using an RDI of 2000 calories: What is my Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) for this supplement?

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Nutrition summary:

Calories 37 Fat 0.11g Carbs 7.77g Protein 1.12g
There are 37 calories in 1 piece of Sushi.
Calorie breakdown: 3% fat, 85% carbs, 12% protein.

Other Common Serving Sizes:

Serving Size Calories
1 piece 37
1 oz 41
100 g 143
1 cup 237

Related Types of Sushi:

Sushi with Vegetables rolled in Seaweed
Sushi with Vegetables
Salmon Sashimi
Sushi with Vegetables and Seafood
California Rolls
  view more sushi nutritional info

Related Types of Fish:

Grilled Fish
Baked or Broiled Salmon
Fish
Tilapia (Fish)
Baked or Broiled Fish
Mahi Mahi
  view more fish nutritional info

See Also:

Southern Tsunami Sushi Bar Spicy Tuna Roll
Bento Nouveau Spicy Salmon Sushi Roll
Salmon Sushi
Wegmans Shrimp Tempura Roll
Southern Tsunami Sushi Bar Rainbow Roll
  view more results
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  1. You should keep in mind that some meals may not be suited for all persons, and you should consult with your doctor before commencing any weight reduction program or diet plan.
  2. Although FatSecret provides the material on this site in good faith and with the belief that it is true, FatSecret makes no claims or guarantees as to its completeness or accuracy, and you should use any information, including nutritional values, at your own risk.
  3. Each and every trademark, copyright, and other type of intellectual property is owned by a specific individual or organization.

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