How To Play Sushi Go?

  1. Choose a card to keep and reveal it after everyone has picked. Look at your hand and select a card you wish to keep.
  2. Pass your remaining hand to the player on your left. To prevent the other players from seeing these cards, place them face down on the table.
  3. Continue playing until you run out of cards. Sushi Go is a simple game of picking and passing cards.
  4. Score the cards by adding up their card types and values. Each type of sushi, from maki rolls to nigiri, nets you a different amount of points.
  5. Discard all of the played cards except the pudding cards. Gather up all of your sushi, dumplings, and other cards.

How do you play sushi go with chopsticks?

When cards are revealed, call out “Sushi Go!!” The chopsticks card is then put back into your hand. This means it will now be passed to the next player, who may take it to use again. NOTE: You may have multiple chopsticks cards in front of you but may only use 1 per turn.

Do you play sushi go with your family?

I play sushi go a lot with my family and they are really good and i always lose. But today I finally beat them for the first time! Thank you so much for putting your time and effort into this website.

Is Sushi Go Party about winning?

This will come in very handy, and yes, of course, it’s about winning! Thanks Interesting and well written – thanks! Sushi Go Party is out now, and I highly recommend that. Great guide, though we play this game a bit less strategical, I love reading analyses like this. Will be passing this on absolutely! Thank you for this!! Thank you!

What is the goal of Sushi Go?

The objective of the game is simple: Score points. Each card is worth a certain number of points. Sometimes you need multiples of one card for it to be worth anything. That makes Sushi Go a game of dilemmas.

Can you play Sushi Go with 2 players?

PLAYING THE GAME The game takes place over 3 rounds. At the start of each round, cards are dealt from the draw pile, face-down to each player. In a 2 player game, deal 10 cards to each player.

What age can eat sushi?

Here Is How To Play:

Sushi Go! Sushi Roll
Age 8+ 8+
Game Play Time 20 Minutes 20 Minutes
Game Type Strategy/ Card Game Strategy/ Dice Game
Game Theme Sushi Sushi

Is Sushi Go a good game?

Overall it is a fun game. Basically you are passing sushi cards around and trying to collect ones that give you points. For example, if you get 3 of a certain card you might get 6 points, or the most of a certain card might give you 4 points, etc. It’s a cute game and the pictures on the cards are adorable.

Whats the difference between Sushi Go and sushi go party?

Sushi Go is portable with no setup. Sushi Go Party requires small setup, comes in a larger box, and is superior in all other aspects.

Can you play Sushi Go with 6 players?

The upcoming sequel to Sushi Go!, Sushi Go Party! will allow for 6-8 players. Among many other features, it allows you to essentially play the original game but with 2-8 players.

What is sushi without rice called?

Nigiri is a type of sushi made of thin slices of raw fish over pressed vinegared rice. Sashimi is thinly sliced raw meat—usually fish, such as salmon or tuna—that is served without rice.

Is Sushi Go a math game?

Sushi Go! contains lots of math, both during the game and at the end of each round when points are totaled. At the beginning of the game, your child will see a bunch of cards but only get to choose one of them.

How to Play Sushi Go

  1. Article to be downloaded article to be downloaded In the past, if you’ve visited a traditional sushi restaurant with a conveyor belt transporting food throughout the dining room, you’ve probably noticed something like this.
  2. Sushi Go is quite similar to this!
  3. Players grab for different varieties of sushi in order to gain points before all of the excellent stuff is gone for good.

Each round of the game consists of three rounds in which each player selects a card before handing the remainder of their hand to the player on their left.At the conclusion of the game, the player who has collected the most value rolls and dishes is declared the winner.

  1. 1 Distribute up to 10 cards each person after they have been shuffled.
  2. The number of cards you deal is determined on the number of players present.
  3. The game is intended for a group of 2 to 5 players.

In a regular 2-person game, each player receives a hand of ten cards.Deal one fewer card for each extra participant in the game.In a 3-player game, deal out 9 cards; in a 4-player game, deal out 8 cards; and in a 5-player game, deal out 7 cards Keep your cards face down so that the other players can’t see what you’re playing with.

2 Place the remaining cards face down in a central pile in the middle of the table. Don’t even bother looking at these cards just yet. During a game of Sushi Go, you will not be able to use them. These cards are given out between rounds in order for you to be able to continue playing. After each round of play, you can choose to reshuffle the cards that were dealt into the deck.

  • Promotional material
  • 3 Select a scorekeeper and provide them with a sheet of paper and a pencil. Following the conclusion of each round, the results are tallied. Choose someone who isn’t averse to completing a little addition and subtraction. At the conclusion of each round of Sushi Go, that individual is responsible for reviewing the cards that each player has used and adding up their values in accordance with the scoring criteria. Due to the fact that the arithmetic is straightforward and all of the cards are labeled, following up with the game isn’t too tough
    Advertisement
  1. Pick one card to retain and reveal it once everyone else makes their selection.
  2. Take a look at your hand and choose one of the cards you want to keep.
  3. Place the card face down in front of you and close your eyes.

With a few exceptions, the card will remain in place until the round is completed.Once everyone has selected a card from their hand, turn the cards over to display the cards that have been chosen.The card you pick is determined by your own approach as well as the sushi you have in your hand.

Before you begin, familiarize yourself with the scoring regulations so that you may make the best decision possible.

  1. 2 Give your remaining hand to the player to your left.
  2. 3 These cards should be placed face down on the table in order to prevent the other players from seeing them.
  3. Assume that the player on your right is extending their hand to you.

Pick up your new business cards when everyone is ready.A different technique to play is to mix around the order in which the cards are passed from round to round.In a typical game, the cards are always dealt from left to right.

Pass them to the right during the second round, for example, to see what happens.

  1. 3 Continue to play until you have exhausted your deck of cards.
  2. Sushi Go is a straightforward card game in which players choose and pass cards.
  3. Each time you pass the cards around, your hand gets less and smaller.

Eventually, each player will only have one card remaining, and they will be forced to play that card.Every time you choose a card, set it in front of you and then turn it over once everyone else has selected a card to continue the game.Keep all of these cards in your possession until the end of the game.

  • 4 Score the cards by adding up the different sorts of cards and their values. You will receive a varied number of points for each style of sushi you order, from maki rolls to nigiri. For further information on how many points each kind is worth, consult the scoring regulations. Fill up a sheet of paper with the number of points won by each player and save the totals until the end of the game. During the round, only the sushi and dumpling cards are for points
  • any unused wasabi or chopstick cards are worth nothing.
  1. 5 With the exception of the pudding cards, discard all of the cards that have been played.
  2. Bring all of your sushi, dumplings, and other cards together in one place.
  3. Any dessert cards you used throughout the round should be left on the table.

As with a traditional dessert, you must wait until the finish of the game before you may have them.Place the cards you’ve acquired in a face-up pile adjacent to the rest of the deck.

  1. 6 Deal cards again and play for a total of three rounds.
  2. Sushi Go is a game that is played in three rounds.
  3. Each round, you distribute the equal number of cards to each participant.

Continue to choose and pass cards in order to try to rack up as many points as you possibly can.At the conclusion of the third round, the individual who has accrued the most number of points wins!Make careful to total up the amount of pudding cards each player has at the end of the last round and include them in the final score after the final round.

    Advertisement
  1. 1 When you play a wasabi card, you will receive triple points on a subsequent turn. Wasabi is an unique score multiplier card that can only be used on nigiri sushi, which is a type of Japanese sushi. You should set your wasabi card in front of you just like any other card when you have it picked out. Pass the remainder of your hand in the same manner as you would ordinarily. And when you locate a card that appeals to you, lay it on top of the wasabi for bonus points to earn more. Using wasabi, for example, is worth 9 points, but only 3 points without it. If you have a wasabi card face up, the next nigiri you take needs to be placed on top of it
  2. otherwise, the next nigiri you take is worth nothing. For example, you cannot set an egg nigiri on the table and then wait to receive a better card. It is necessary to arrange the egg nigiri on top of the wasabi.
  3. You can have as many wasabi cards as you like, but keep in mind that any wasabi that goes unused at the conclusion of a game will not be worth any points.
  • If you play a chopstick card, you will receive 2 sushi cards on a subsequent turn. A chopstick card is equivalent to an additional turn. Sushi Go is the command to utilize the chopstick card after the other players have selected their cards. Choose another card from your hand to use as a playable card. Put the chopstick card back in your hand so that other players will have an opportunity to utilize it. If you have numerous chopstick cards face up in front of you, you are only allowed to use one of them every round
  • otherwise, you are unable to use any.
  • Chopstick cards, like wasabi, are worth zero points at the conclusion of a game. Make sure to utilize them during the round in order to rack up points.
  1. 3 Different varieties of nigiri must be selected in order to get a specific number of points.
  2. A variety of nigiri rolls are available at Sushi Go, each with a unique flavor.
  3. The greatest sort of fish to catch is squid, which is worth three points per pound.

In this game, each salmon nigiri is worth 2 points, whereas each egg nigiri is for 1 point.Nigiri is the most constant way to get points since you gain points for each piece of nigiri you have at the conclusion of the round.Don’t forget to include the wasabi!

Each nigiri on a wasabi card is worth three times as many points as the previous one.Squid is worth nine points, salmon is worth six points, and eggs are for three points.

  1. 4 Choose tempura and sashimi only if you are able to prepare them in sets.
  2. It is only when you pick up matching cards throughout a game that tempura and sashimi contribute towards your score.
  3. You’ll need two tempura cards or three sashimi cards to complete the task.

Because these cards are in limited availability and other players will be seeking to match them, pursuing them can be a little hazardous, especially because they are in restricted quantity.These cards are more valuable than nigiri, but you must use them on numerous turns before they begin to accrue any value.If you have wasabi or other valuable cards to play, it’s a gamble that may not be worth your time and effort.

  • 5 Gather additional cards in order to prevent other players from scoring. Dumplings, maki rolls, and pudding are among the remaining card kinds available. Each of these cards has its own set of scoring rules. The greater the number of dumpling cards you play, the more points you receive. The player who receives the most maki rolls at the end of each round receives a large number of points, and pudding cards are used in a similar manner at the conclusion of each round. Dumplings are the most reliable way to get points out of the three card kinds. Because they are often overlooked by other players, Maki rolls and pudding can be a sneaky way to get significant points
  • however, they must be balanced with your other card picks. If you choose to ignore them, other players will take them and get points for themselves. However, if you concentrate on nigiri and other cards, you may be able to get more points.
    Advertisement
  1. To find out who receives 3 to 6 points, add up all of the maki roll icons together. Each maki roll card has a set of icons written at the top of the card. Each card contains anywhere from one to three icons. The individual who has the most number of maki roll icons wins 6 points. The individual who has the second-highest number of icons receives three points. In the event of a tie, the points should be divided equally between the two players. For example, if two players are tied for the most maki rolls, each receives three points
  2. if two players are tied for first, neither receives any points for second
  • 2Determine the number of tempura pairings that are worth 5 points each to be made. Tempura, the deep-fried shrimp cards, are only effective when used in pairs. A single tempura card is completely worthless. Every pair of shoes you own earns you additional points.
  • 3 For every three-piece sashimi set, award 10 points. Sashimi cards and tempura cards both function in the same way. If you only have one or two pieces of sashimi, you will not receive any points for them. Every three-piece set earns you a considerable number of bonus points. It’s difficult to get numerous sets of sashimi every round, so you might want to concentrate on other types of sushi instead.

4 Add up the total points earned from the nigiri that each participant has received.Stack the wasabi cards on top of the nigiri and serve immediately.Keep in mind that squid nigiri is worth three points, salmon is worth two, and eggs are worth one.If the nigiri is placed on top of a wasabi card, the point value of the nigiri is tripled.Make a note of the total on a scorecard so you can keep track of it between rounds.

See also:  How To Get Pizza Sauce Out Of Carpet?

Wasabi cards are worthless if they are not accompanied with nigiri.Nigiri, on the other hand, is only worth triple points if it is played on top of a wasabi card, and vice versa.

5 Each dumpling card is worth an increasing number of points in an exponential fashion.The dumplings, on the other hand, are possibly the most difficult to master.One point is awarded for each dumpling consumed.After then, each subsequent dumpling is accompanied by an additional bonus.The greater the number of dumplings you have, the more points you receive.

You receive 3 points for a pair of dumpling cards.If you have three cards, you will receive six points.The total number of cards increases to ten for four cards.If you are able to gather 5 or more cards, you will receive 15 points for your efforts.

  • 6 At the conclusion of the game, count the pudding to see who has the most. Examine the number of pudding cards each player has after you have completed the third round of play. Six points are awarded to the individual who has the most pudding. If there are more than two players, the individual who consumes the least amount of pudding loses six points on the game. If there is a tie between the participants, the points are divided between them. Suppose two players tie for the least quantity of pudding
  • in that case both players are penalized by three points
  • and if all players have the same number of pudding cards, no one is penalized by three points. It’s an uncommon occurrence, but it does happen
    Advertisement

Inquire about something There are 200 characters remaining. Include your email address so that you may be notified when this question has been resolved. Advertisement submissions are welcome.

VideoRead Video Transcript

  • When splitting up points from sushi rolls and pudding, don’t include any leftovers. For example, if two persons tie for the second-highest total of maki, instead of awarding each player 1.5 points, grant each player 1 point. It makes it much easy to total up the points.
  • As you play, think about your strategy. Because high-scoring cards might be tough to come by at times, good players must be able to adjust quickly.
  • When possible, make use of wasabi and chopstick cards. Nothing is gained if you do not employ your resources prior to the conclusion of the round.

Thank you for submitting a suggestion for consideration! Advertisement

Things You’ll Need

  • Sushi Go cards
  • Paper
  • Pencil

About This Article

Summary of the ArticleX Sushi Go!is a fun card game for 2-5 players in which players compete to get the most points by using a variety of sushi cards to complete various tasks.To begin the game, shuffle the Sushi Go!cards and deal 10 cards to each player if you’re playing with two players, 9 cards to each player if you’re playing with three players, 8 cards to each player if you’re playing with four players, and 7 cards to each player if you’re playing with five players.Place the remaining cards face-down in the center of the playing area to complete the deck.

Keeping one card from their hand, each player sets it face down in front of them and then discards the rest of their cards.When everyone has revealed their face-down card, they all pass the card they are holding onto the player to their left.Players pick a card from their new hand that they wish to keep and place it face-down in front of them for the second time.As soon as everyone has made their selection, players expose their card and pass their hand to the left once more.The game continues in this manner until all of the cards have been dealt face up on the table to the winner.Choosing an egg, squid, or salmon nigiri card from their hand and having a wasabi card face-up in front of them, a player must place their nigiri card on the wasabi card, which increases the value of their card by thrice.

On each wasabi card, a single nigiri card can be used to complete the set.Should one of the chopsticks cards be face-up on the table before a player’s next turn, that player may select two cards from their hand instead of one on that turn.They then take the chopsticks card out of their palm and pass it to the next person.Each player is limited to one usage of the chopsticks card every round.As soon as all of the cards have been played, each player scores the cards that are face up on the table.

  • Each point is worth six points to the person who has the most number of total maki roll icons (shown at the top of the cards).
  • The person who has the second-highest total number of maki roll icons receives three points.
  • In the event of a tie, the points are divided equally between the two players involved.
  • It is worth 5 points for each pair of tempura cards a player possesses.
  • A set of three sashimi cards is worth a total of ten points.

Sushi cards with squid, salmon, and egg nagiri are worth three points apiece, whereas nagiri cards with tuna are for two points and egg nagiri are worth one point.When a nagiri card is played on top of a wasabi card, its value is quadrupled.Weasabi cards that aren’t used in conjunction with nagiri cards are completely worthless.

The quantity of points you receive for dumpling cards is proportional to the number of dumpling cards you have.A single dumpling is worth one point, two dumplings are worth three points, three dumplings are worth six points, four dumplings are worth ten points, and five or more dumplings are worth fifteen points; nonetheless, a single dumpling is worth one point.Pudding cards are kept until the end of the game and are not scored on.After each player has scored their cards, shuffle the cards (with the exception of the pudding cards) and hand a fresh round to the remaining players.The game is divided into three rounds.

After three rounds have been completed, participants score their pudding cards and add the points earned to their overall score.The player who has the most number of pudding cards receives six points.The person who has the fewest pudding cards loses six points if there are more than two participants in the game.After three rounds, the winner is determined by who has amassed the most number of points.If there is a tie, the player who has the most number of pudding cards is the winner.Did you find this overview to be helpful?

  • Thank you to all writers for contributing to this page, which has been read 15,696 times so far.

Sushi Go Strategy Guide

I’m going to presume you’re already familiar with the game’s rules and procedures.Avoid reading this if you are expecting a review or instructions; instead, simply get the game; it is quite entertaining and I guarantee you will like it.Let’s throw ourselves into the deep end.Sushi Go is a game where you have a restricted amount of choices for each round.For example, in a four-player game, only 8 points are awarded every round.

It is critical that you constantly examine how many points you might be able to earn from a particular selection.Because you are frequently merely drafting a chance for points (like in the case of Maki, Sashimi, and Tempura…pretty much everything other than Nigiri), I use the word possibly.Sashimi, for example, is worth 3.33 points each selection, with the possibility of completely failing and earning you a score of zero.It goes without saying that you should strive to avoid taking risks until you are certain that you will be able to finish the combination.Let’s take a look at the card count first, before we go into the details of each card.

Tempura 14 times 14 pieces of Sashimi 14 pieces of dumpling 12 x 2Maki and 8 x 3Maki are used.6 pieces of 1Maki 10 pieces of Salmon Nigiri 5 pieces of Squid Nigiri 5 × Nigiri (egg rolls) Pudding 10 times the size of a normal serving Wasabi (six times) 4 pairs of chopsticks We have a total of 108 cards.This is critical if you want to be able to predict how cards will be distributed in new packs.We may infer from this data that 14/108 cards are sashimi.That is slightly more than one card out of every ten dealt.

  • Basically, you’re lucky if you get even three pieces of sashimi in your pool, so pick your spots wisely.
  • Anyway, let’s come back to the topic of points per card and examine each selection.
  • Points-per-card shall be abbreviated as PPC in this article.
  • Following the overall review, I’ll proceed to assess the first-round draft pick’s prospects.
  • After the initial selection, the answer to every question becomes ″it depends″ and it is hard to make an informed decision.

The first option is straightforward and uncomplicated.The PPC score is 1/2/3 (+Wasabi score is 1.5/3/4.5).The single egg nigiri is only worth a pitiful one point in this competition.

The only things that are worth selecting over are those that offer you no points, and even then, it is only worth picking over them if doing so would prevent an opponent from completing a sashimi/tempura combo.Salmon and squid nigiri, on the other hand, are both exceptionally good value for money.In addition to providing a high point value without the need to worry about striking a combination, when paired with a wasabi, they may yield some outstanding results.Initial Choice – Squid Nigiri is a fantastic first choice for seafood.A higher profit per centage (ppc) than tempura (2.5) and nearly as high as sashimi (1.5).

(3.33).Nigiri with eggs is, without a doubt, a disaster.Fish is definitely not excellent enough to be the first choice, however I can construct some fringe hands that would make selecting salmon easier.For example, sashimi, egg nigiri, sashimi, 1maki, pudding, 2maki, salmon, salmon, sashimi, 1maki, pudding, 2maki, salmon, salmon 2.5 points on the PPC scale Tempura is a reasonable choice for a starter.However, despite the fact that it looks to be inferior than sashimi in terms of points, its consistency really makes it a superior choice.If you do it frequently enough, you will be able to grab back-to-back tempura without allowing your opponents a chance to counter.

  • First Pick – This happens very seldom.
  • Just like wasabi, chopsticks, 3Maki, and squid nigiri aren’t worth enough points to justify taking over the table.
  • However, if none of those options are available in your pack, this is most likely your best option.

PPC – 3.333 (Percentage Points) It’s a trap, believe me!Sashimi is quite appetizing, especially if you open a package that has two pieces right in it.The difficulty with sashimi is that it is quite easy for other players to prevent you from obtaining the third piece of fish.It just takes a single dead card from your opponent to generate a pair of dead cards for yourself.A lucrative block, especially when it’s further in the pack and the number of excellent options is dwindling.

On top of that, there is a considerable potential that three sashimi aren’t even in the pool, and you will be drawn dead if this happens.I would suggest simply ignoring this situation and focusing on the simple points.First Pick – This happens very seldom.Never say never, but occasionally it’s a good bet, especially on pack three if you’re already content with your pudding tally for the week.

During the third round, opponents will frequently prefer puddings in order to escape out of the danger zone, allowing you to sneak in sushi.However, there is a significant chance of players simply shutting you out, as well as the possibility of the whole trifecta not being present in the pool.PPC – a maximum of three points A similar trap exists with dumplings, but unlike with sashimi, they always provide a positive outcome.

The large dumpling combo could appear to be intriguing until you discover that even at the maximum combo, they are only worth 3 points per pick, and anything less than the maximum is considered to be quite mediocre in quality.You shouldn’t even attempt to make dumplings until you are confident in your ability to make four of them.However, they are worth less points than sashimi and occur at the same frequency as sashimi.Keep in mind that 6 dumplings are worth the same as 5 dumplings in terms of monetary value.If you have finished your combination, any more dumplings are completely useless.

First and foremost, almost never.The only situation in which I would consider choosing a dumpling first is if the pack contains three or more.That way, you can take one and be confident that at least one more will come around.You can sneak in 1-2 extra dumpling selections while your opponents aren’t looking and catch them off guard.By the time your first pack arrives, your opponents will most likely be unable to prevent you from advancing.

Of course, this gambit is only viable if there are at least 5 dumplings in the pool.PPC – a maximum of 6.Maki are the polar opposite of dumplings in terms of texture and flavor.In other words, the greater the number of points you have, the less points each one is worth.

The highest-scoring maki, if it wins the high-scoring contest, is worth a whopping 6 points, and it is very feasible!However, for every additional maki you draft following the first, your value per card decreases.After everything is said and done, picking up three maki at once is a wise investment since in most pools, it will be enough to earn you at least three points, either by taking 2nd place or by snatching another later-pick maki for 1st place.The first option is ″sometimes.″ Showing a 3maki early in the game is frequently enough to demoralize or scare your opponents into not investing.Unless someone makes a significant investment in cards, a maki count of 5-6 is frequently sufficient to secure first place.

If this is the case, bear in mind how much value each maki will provide you when compared to other cards in your deck.You don’t want to take 3 or more selections only to finish second on the Maki count if you could have chosen better options in the beginning.Even winning first place on maki may not be worth it if you lose track of how many selections you have left.

PPC – a maximum of 6.Pudding is, without a doubt, the most difficult card to judge.As the drafting rounds proceed and your future options become more limited, the value of your pudding cards increases.However, the demand for pudding continues to grow.The rule of thumb is that you should choose any card worth 2.5 or more over a pudding in the hopes that another pudding may emerge in the future, allowing you to make a more profitable selection.

  • On subsequent choices, though, everyone else will be focusing their attention on the desert with greater fervor (just like you are).
  • When individuals prefer to let their pudding count float around, it might be advantageous to front load your pudding count in pack one so that you can escape the brawl on following packs and score some powerful cards.
  • The first option is ″sometimes.″ There are a variety of factors that influence when you should have pudding.
  • I would never recommend selecting the first pudding from the first pack.

In packs 2 or 3, you should choose pudding first to see if it would put you in first place or get you out of last place in the order.There is a decision to be made in pack three.You are either going to fight for pudding or you aren’t going to fight for pudding.

See also:  9 Inch Pizza How Many Slices?

If you answered yes, start by choosing a pudding and drawing a sketch of each one you see.PPC 4.5 or 3 is a good choice.Obviously, the aim with wasabi is to combine it with a squid nigiri to get a whopping 9 points for your efforts.

  1. Except for the miraculous single-maki 6-pointer, that is the finest value in the entire game.
  2. You can get a decent 6 points even with the fallback option of salmon nigiri, which is better than a tempura combination.
  3. Wasabi, on the other hand, has a short duration of potency.

In most cases, it turns into egg nigiri fodder after the third pick…Or even worse.First and foremost, always.In Sushi Go, the likelihood of landing a piece of fresh squid or salmon in any of the following two options is high enough that this is the ideal initial pick.If you are playing with people that are powerful enough to choose squid nigiri first, you may need to exercise some caution, since they may kick you out of the game immediately away if you do not.But even in that case, you should be able to catch a salmon, which is quite acceptable.

PPC – 3-6 The sticks, like wasabi, are quite valuable early on and then rapidly depreciate in value.It’s reasonable to estimate that chopsticks are worth around 6 points as a selection if you choose them early in the game due of the combination possibilities they provide.First and foremost, always.If you order them first, you have a very good chance of getting a good combo, such as 2x tempura, combo-wasabi, double maki, or even double sashimi, if you order them last.

Game Components

  • A total of 108 cards: 14x Tempura
  • 14x Sashimi
  • 14x dumpling
  • 12x 2 Maki rolls
  • 8x 3 Maki rolls
  • 6x 1 Maki roll
  • 10x Salmon Nigiri
  • 5x Squid Nigiri
  • 5x Egg Nigiri
  • 10x Pudding
  • 6x Wasabi
  • 4x Chopsticks
  • 14x Tempura
  • 14x Sashimi

Setup

  • Shuffle all of the cards well and deal the following cards to the participants, according to the number of players: Give each participant ten cards if you’re playing a two-person game.
  • Assign nine cards to each participant in a three-person game
  • To begin a four-player game, deal eight cards to each of the players.
  • Distribute seven cards to each participant in a five-person game.

(Hold your cards in your hand, keeping them hidden from your opponents.) Place the remaining cards face-down in the center of the playing area, away from your opponents. Gather some paper and a pencil to keep track of the score, and choose one player to serve as the scorekeeper.

Tutorial Video

Game play

In all, three rounds are played in this game.The round begins when all players pick one card from their hands that they would want to keep and place it face-down in front of them, simultaneously.When each player has completed this task, everyone exposes the cards they have selected.Immediately after showing cards, transfer your remaining hand to the player to your left, face down.Everyone takes up their new hands, and the game moves on to the next turn.

You now have the option of selecting a new and smaller hand.Please keep in mind that face-up cards stay in your possession until the end of the round, when they are scored.It is beneficial to arrange cards of the same type together for ease of use.

Using Wasabi

If you pick a squid, salmon, or egg nigiri card and there is already a wasabi card in front of you, the nigiri must be placed on top of the wasabi card to be considered complete.That the nigiri has been dipped in wasabi has increased the worth of the dish by a factor of three!Nota bene: Although you may have many wasabi cards in front of you, each wasabi card may only have one nigiri card placed on it.

Using Chopsticks

If you already have a chopsticks card in front of you, you will be able to take two sushi cards on your next turn as well!The way it works is as follows: As is customary, choose the first card from your hand that you want to play.Take a second card from your hand and place it face-down on the table before the rest of the players do likewise.After then, all of the players show their cards.Put the chopsticks card back into your hand before passing the game on to the next person.

This implies that it will now be passed on, and other people will be able to utilize it in the future.Please keep in mind that you may have many chopsticks cards in front of you, but you may only use one of them every round.

Ending a round

As soon as the final card of each hand is handed on, just place it face-up among the other cards you have collected. (While this last card is rarely of any use, it is possible that an unfortunate player will be compelled to leave you with something of value.

Scoring

Maki Rolls

All of the maki roll icons at the top of each player’s maki roll cards are added together to form a total for each player.The player who collects the most number of icons wins 6 points.If many players tie for the most points, they divide the 6 points evenly (ignoring any remaining points) and no second place points are granted.If multiple players tie for the most points, no second place points are awarded.The player who has the second-highest number of icons receives three points.

If more than one player is tied for second place, the points are divided equally among them (ignoring any remainder).

Tempura

A set of two tempura cards earns you five points. A single tempura card is completely worthless. In a single round, you may score many sets of tempura.

Sashimi

A set of three sashimi cards earns you ten points. A single sashimi card or a set of only two sashimi cards is worthless. It is possible to score numerous sets of sashimi in a round, albeit it is quite difficult to do so.

Dumplings

The more the number of dumpling cards you have, the greater the number of points you will get, as follows:

Dumplings 1 2 3 4 5 and more
Points 1 3 6 10 15

Nigiri and wasabi

A squid nigiri earns you three points.If it is placed on top of a wasabi card, it earns 9 points for the player.2 points are awarded for a salmon nigiri.6 points are awarded when it is placed on top of a wasabi card, for example.A single point is awarded for an egg nigiri.

If it is placed on top of a wasabi card, it earns 3 points for the player.A wasabi card that does not contain any nigiri is worthless.

Chopsticks

A card with chopsticks gets you nothing.

Starting a new round

Make a public announcement of your scores from the previous round so that the scorekeeper can record them.Place your cards face-up alongside the draw pile and discard them.There are just two exceptions: pudding cards, which you must maintain in front of you at all times in order to be scored at the conclusion of the game.Distribute another hand of cards from the draw pile to each player in an amount equal to the quantity of cards dealt in the previous round.

End of the game

There will be some cards left in the draw pile after the third round has been completed and scored. These are not taken into consideration. Now it’s time for some sweet treats! The pudding cards have been scored at this point.

Puddings

The player who has the most number of pudding cards wins 6 points.If many players tie for the most points, the points are divided equally among them (ignoring any remainder).A total of 6 points are deducted from the player who has the fewest pudding cards (including those who have none).If many players tie for the least amount of points, the points are divided equally between them (ignoring any remainder).Please keep in mind that in a two-player game, no one loses any points for puddings.

Only the points earned by collecting the greatest number of pudding cards are rewarded.After three rounds, the winner is determined by who has accrued the most number of points.In the event of a tie, the person with the most number of pudding cards wins!Read on for more information.

Why We Love the Game Sushi Go

Sushi Go is a simple game to learn, but it is difficult to master.It’s just as entertaining to play at a family game night as it is to play with friends in a bar.For me, as the person in my buddy group who is generally in charge of introducing and explaining new games to the others, a game that requires little setup and is simple to play is highly desirable.Sushi Go does an excellent job with this.It necessitates a certain amount of luck and memory, which is what keeps both new and veteran players returning for more.

Sushi Go is a card-drafting game, which means that players are tasked with assembling sets of cards that are worth varying amounts of points.Instead of everyone drawing cards from a single community deck, each player begins with a hand of cards and chooses one card to add to their existing collection of playing cards.Afterwards, they pass the rest of the cards in their hand on to the player to their left.Because of the pass-and-play dynamic, you must keep track of not only the cards you have and require, but also the cards other opponents have and require.Predicting the cards your opponents desire and thwarting their schemes is what keeps this game so frustratingly entertaining.Quite simply, the goal of the game is to complete it.

Earn points by completing tasks.Each card has a specific quantity of points associated with it.Sometimes, in order for a single card to be worth anything, you must have multiples of it.As a result, Sushi Go is a game of conundrums.Do you grab a shrimp tempura card despite the fact that you know you’ll need another?

  • What do you do when a mouthwatering piece of sashimi passes you by so you may pile extra maki on your plate?
  • What happens if another player snatches it before it gets a chance to circle back to the starting position?
  • The internal monologue never comes to an end.
  • The game is over once three complete rounds of passing hands around the group, which can include anywhere from two to five players, are completed.
  • The winner is determined by who has the most points at the end of three rounds, which takes around 20 minutes on average.

Sushi Go’s rapid gameplay makes it ideal for passing the time at a bar, which is where I first began to play, and it is a big reason why my friends and I enjoy coming back to it time and time again.Another reason why this game continues to be a joy to play is the lovely artwork that appears on each of the cards.Sushi Go, when combined with its one-of-a-kind hand-passing feature, creates the authentic experience of sitting at a sushi bar, watching rolls pass by on a conveyor belt while you stress over which ones to grab before someone else does.

If you find yourself growing weary of the basic cards, or if you wish to play with a group larger than five people, Sushi Go Party expands on the original game by including a large number of extra cards for players to select from.Sushi Go Party has grown to be more than double the size of its predecessor.Consequently, it is substantially less portable than the standard game—but it will be able to handle a total of up to eight participants.

Amazon.com: Sushi Go! – The Pick and Pass Card Game: Toys & Games

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product This is the game that our entire family enjoys!On April 21, 2017, a review was conducted in the United States.This is a game that we simply adore!We started with the smaller deck, and it took a few of hands and a YouTube video to figure it out, but we enjoyed it so much that we bought this one as well!Warning: if you haven’t played the original deck before, doing both of these the first time out of the gate will most likely be too much for you.

Although this is unfortunate, there is some good news in that both the basic deck and the expansion deck are individually packaged.It is the deck with the sashimi, wasabi, tempura, chopsticks, maki rolls, and a few other items that is considered the starting deck.You will also discover thick card slates that depict each sort of card in the collection.Remembering what the cards are all about is made easier with these handy reminders.The game board and pieces are not required, although they are beneficial.It’s a really entertaining game, although it does take some effort to master the basics!

It isn’t a game of Uno!;).Enjoy!

Top reviews from the United States

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

The document was reviewed in the United States on April 30, 2017.Purchase that has been verified If you’re thinking about getting this item right now, and money isn’t an issue, you might try Sushi Go Party instead than Amazon.Sushi Go Party!Is a card game about sushi.

  • However, although Sushi Go!
  • is a fantastic game, Sushi Go Party is virtually everything that Sushi Go!
  • is plus a whole lot more.
  • However, I’ve heard stories that the quality of the card stock used in Sushi Go Party is a little worse than that used in Sushi Go!, but I haven’t had the opportunity to play with the Party version to confirm this.
  • Sushi Go!

is a fantastic game, and the card paper used in it is excellent.A ″pass and play″ game, Sushi Go!was the first of its kind that I had ever experienced.It was a lot of fun.

  • Every player starts with a handful of cards, chooses one to play, and then passes the remaining cards (which include all of the cards they elected not to play) onto the person next to them, who continues the process.
  • This process continues indefinitely until all of the cards have been dealt.
  • After all of the games have been completed, you will add up everyone’s scores for the round and determine who has won.
  • This is one of those games that I pull out when the other players aren’t into video games in general.
  • It’s simple enough to learn, and the subject is both adorable and, well, delicious.
  • The rounds are short enough that people will not become bored, and because everyone is effectively taking their turn at the exact same moment, there will be no waiting around between rounds.
  • This game, in my opinion, is a little too chaotic for my tastes in strategic, sluggish games.
  • Given that everyone is playing at the same time, it might be tough to tailor your strategy to match the actions of your fellow players.
  1. It’s also difficult to keep track of everything that’s happening as you transfer the cards from person to person as the game progresses.
  2. I saw the maki roll the last time I was here, but it’s no longer there.
  3. Or has it simply not returned as of yet?
  4. Look around the table to check whether anyone has already played it.
  5. By that point, you’ve nearly completely halted the game!
  6. This fast and furious component of the game is also what makes it enjoyable, so there isn’t much to complain about there.
  1. The only other little quibble I have with the game is that, despite the fact that it is extremely fast-paced and intense, scoring each round takes a fraction of a second.
  2. There are multipliers in play, and each card kind has a unique manner of being scored, so it is not possible to just look around the table and identify who won the round.
  3. However, it was a good time!
  4. There are plenty of laughs, and it is ideal for beginner gaming groups.
  5. When played with four players, it’s an excellent game to play with a group of friends or a couple of couples.
  6. The metal tin is also of high quality!
  • Reviewed on December 27, 2018 in the United States of America Purchase that has been verified My 8-year-old shouted with delight when she saw the adorable tiny wasabi, and then proceeded to annihilate us with her incredible pick of cards.
  • This is a fantastic introduction to the game.
  • For those who are unfamiliar with card drafting games, they consist of picking a card to play and then passing all of the cards to the person to your left.
  • Continue until all of the cards have been used, then sum up your points.
  • Once this process has been repeated three times, the game is ended.
  • The name derives from the process of selecting the cards that would maximize your points while understanding that you will not be able to obtain them all – and neither will your opponents!

Sushi Go!features enough variation in the cards and their powers to allow for genuine strategy to be employed, and the artwork is charming, as seen by the squeals from the audience.As my injured ego should also inform you, it is also simple enough for children to understand and enjoy themselves.Families and groups of friends that enjoy playing games will find this book to be quite beneficial.On April 21, 2020, a review was published in the United States of America.Several individuals have been raving about this game for a lengthy period of time.

I’ve finally figured it out, and I can understand why.It is a fast-paced set-collection game with a lot of strategic elements.It is simple to play and entertaining, and people can become rather boisterous when they are having a good time.I was torn between buying this game or the party version, and I ultimately decided on this one.While I am very satisfied with this edition, I truly wish I had spent a little more money on the Party version because the amount of people you can have in this game is restricted.This is a fantastic game for family game night, but I am unable to play it on larger game evenings with friends because of its complexity.

I wish I had considered this before purchasing because the Party version scales up so easily without sacrificing any of the game play principles (in fact, it adds some), is entertaining, and can be played with less players without losing any of the fun.In the event that I were to purchase a version of Sushi Go!, I would recommend investing a little extra money and purchasing Sushi Go Party!On January 7, 2018, a review was published in the United States, and the purchase was verified.

  1. This is a game that will never grow old.
  2. In addition to being a wonderful introduction for new card players to games other than Uno or standard playing cards, it has a highly family-friendly concept as well.
  3. You may also play this game with individuals of various ages, since children will undoubtedly find it entertaining as well.
  4. Lessons may be taught in minutes since the instructions are simple and easy to understand.
  5. Due to the fact that it is a fast-paced game that requires little work to strategize, my family frequently utilizes this game to start or conclude our gaming night together.
  6. For a thorough walkthrough of the game, go to YouTube and search for ″Tabletop Sushi Go.″ The video begins at the 18:45 minute point and continues throughout.

On April 21, 2017, a verified purchase was reviewed in the United States.This is a game that we simply adore!We started with the smaller deck, and it took a few of hands and a YouTube video to figure it out, but we enjoyed it so much that we bought this one as well!Warning: if you haven’t played the original deck before, doing both of these the first time out of the gate will most likely be too much for you.Although this is unfortunate, there is some good news in that both the basic deck and the expansion deck are individually packaged.It is the deck with the sashimi, wasabi, tempura, chopsticks, maki rolls, and a few other items that is considered the starting deck.

You will also discover thick card slates that depict each sort of card in the collection.Remembering what the cards are all about is made easier with these handy reminders.The game board and pieces are not required, although they are beneficial.It’s a really entertaining game, although it does take some effort to master the basics!It isn’t a game of Uno!;).

  • Enjoy!
  • 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product This is the game that our entire family enjoys!
  • On April 21, 2017, a review was conducted in the United States.
  • This is a game that we simply adore!
  1. We started with the smaller deck, and it took a few of hands and a YouTube video to figure it out, but we enjoyed it so much that we bought this one as well!
  2. Warning: if you haven’t played the original deck before, doing both of these the first time out of the gate will most likely be too much for you.
  3. Although this is unfortunate, there is some good news in that both the basic deck and the expansion deck are individually packaged.
  4. It is the deck with the sashimi, wasabi, tempura, chopsticks, maki rolls, and a few other items that is considered the starting deck.
  1. You will also discover thick card slates that depict each sort of card in the collection.
  2. Remembering what the cards are all about is made easier with these handy reminders.
  3. The game board and pieces are not required, although they are beneficial.
  1. It’s a really entertaining game, although it does take some effort to master the basics!
  2. It isn’t a game of Uno!;).
  3. Enjoy!
  4. The photographs in this review

Top reviews from other countries

A rating of one out of five stars Don’t make a purchase from this merchant.verified purchase reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 15, 2017Verified Purchase This is the Czech language version of the document.Make no mistake about it: the photographs and remarks are not to be trusted.It is written in Czech.

  • If you purchase something and are dissatisfied with it, you will be responsible for the shipping costs to return it.
  • a rating of one out of five stars Do not purchase if you want the English language version!
  • It’s a czech word.
  • On June 21, 2017, a reviewer in the United Kingdom expressed satisfaction with their purchase.
  • Do not purchase if you want the English language version!

It appeared to be an English version at first glance, based on the image I saw, but after having this item in my cart for a week, it was discovered to be a Czech version.a rating of one out of five stars Photos that are misleading On June 21, 2017, a reviewer in the United Kingdom expressed satisfaction with their purchase.It is advertised with English writing on the images, however it is in fact the Czech edition, and none of the content is written in English.The only version available on Amazon UK is the one I received, so I had to return it and purchase something else.

  • 4.0 stars out of 5 for this product A simple, quick, and enjoyable game for couples, families, and groups of friends.
  • On July 17, 2021, a review was published in the United Kingdom, confirming the purchase.
  • We got this game as a fast game that we could play as a couple, but also with others if we wanted to get together.
  • Learning the rules may appear to be a hard task at first, but it will only take one round until you have them down pat.
  • We can move through a game at breakneck speed now, yet each game retains a high degree of replayability.
  • The game is played by dealing a certain number of cards to each player, who then picks one of those cards to place in front of them to begin the round.
  • Each player takes turns passing the leftover cards to the next person in line.
  • This cycle is continued until all of the cards have been dealt with (i.e.
  1. there are no more cards in the players hands).
  2. The cards that have been played score points in unique combinations, and at the end of each round, the person who has amassed the most number of points wins the round in question.
  3. Sushi is the subject of the game, as suggested by the name, and the cards are visually appealing to players of all ages and abilities.
  4. The game is obviously appropriate for older children, but we play it as a couple of adult groups, and everyone involved enjoys it every time we get together to play.
  5. 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product This is an excellent introduction to ″real″ card games.
  6. On March 9, 2018, a reviewer in the United Kingdom stated that they had made a verified purchase.
  1. I was torn between purchasing this and the party edition, but ultimately concluded that the price difference was not worth it because the game is basically the same and it will be easier for my non-gaming friends and family to take up than the party version.
  2. And what a delightfully simple game it is!
  3. All of the praise has been heaped upon the artwork and portability, so I’ll concentrate on the gameplay itself.
  4. The target sets and card numbers are all fairly evenly distributed, and the game incorporates a fantastic draft mechanic that makes it significantly more interesting than more conventional games.
  5. The cards and prints are of excellent quality, and I was pleasantly surprised by the large number of cards that were sent.
  6. The only thing I would say is that the rulebook does not explain things as well as I would have wanted, but I was fortunate in that I had previously witnessed games being played and was familiar with the fundamental premise of the game.
  • It’s a common occurrence to be given the intricacies of a game before learning the overall goal and what you’ll be spending the most of your playing time doing.
  • I haven’t played it with more than three people yet, but I assume it would be just as enjoyable with five or six, which isn’t something you can say about many games.
  • Adding additional players to a game would sometimes cause it to bog down or become too chaotic, but this is not the case here because you are continually passing, selecting, and receiving cards.
  • I like the new 2 player rules, but I haven’t tested them yet.
  • They appeared to be a little fiddly at first glance, but I’m sure they took a long time to design.
  • My daughter, who is just three and a half years old, was completely enamored with it and even joined in on a few games with us.

By the end, she had grasped the concept of needing to create sets of cards from each of the four card families, and she was really pleased with herself for earning the number of points we informed her she had earned.

Amazon.com: Customer reviews: Sushi Go!

3.0 stars out of 5 for this product Instead, invest in the deluxe edition.In addition, tins are a nightmare!Purchase a deck box.On August 27, 2021, a review will be conducted in the United States.

  • Even though I knew the Party edition of this game was superior, I decided to purchase it nevertheless because the base game was just a third of the price of the Party version, and I wanted to give it a go.
  • The tin is also much smaller than the Party version, and I had intended to keep the adorable tiny Sushi Go!
  • tin when I initially got it, so I really wanted it.
  • As you can see in my photos, the Sushi Go!
  • tin arrived with very serious damage to the corner, which is why I’ve changed my opinion.

Mine is still functional, but it is aesthetically displeasing.I don’t intend to be blunt, but putting games in tins is not a good idea in general, and it’s especially bad if you’re shipping them in a bubble mailer.A number of my cards were also damaged on the central edge of the card, which was a disappointment.It’s a strange defect, but I’m relieved that they aren’t badly noticeable (I barely noticed it while playing solo).

  • Another feature is that many of them have an arching shape to them.
  • Even though it’s difficult to notice in the photo, it’s obvious when you grasp them in your hands.
  • Last but not least, if you want to sleeve the cards, they will not fit inside the tin properly.
  • A 100-card deck box can be purchased for less than $10.00, so this isn’t a big concern.
  • The most significant disadvantage of the tin is that it is unsuitable for travel; it may easily be damaged with sufficient effort.
  • One misstep with your backpack or handbag and you’ve damaged your tin completely.
  • I realize that you could easily purchase a deck box to store your cards for a reasonable price, but I just wanted to point out that the tin that the game comes in is not suitable for traveling.
  • However, it appears to be in good condition while on display!
  1. The sushi are embossed, and the image is a joy to look at in its simplicity.
  2. Something positive to mention: the cards were excellent and substantial, and the small drawings and instruction manual were both thoughtful touches.
  3. This is also a simple and quick game, so I believe that both children and adults would have a good time playing this together.
  4. If you’re looking for something little to throw in your bag or put in your car, this could be the item for you.
  5. If you want a better game for a family game night at home, the deluxe edition is the way to go.

Nigiri vs Sashimi

Nigiri is a form of sushi that consists of a slice of raw fish on top of pressed vinegared rice, and it is popular in Japan.Sashimi is simply thin slices of extremely fresh fish or meat that are served raw, sometimes on a bed of shredded daikon radish, in a Japanese style.Contrary to common assumption, sashimi is not the same as sushi, despite the fact that sashimi is always available on the menu at all sushi establishments.

Comparison chart

Nigiri versus Sashimi comparison chart

Nigiri Sashimi
Introduction Nigiri is a type of sushi made of thin slices of raw fish over pressed vinegared rice. Sashimi is thinly sliced raw meat—usually fish, such as salmon or tuna—that is served without rice.
Is it cooked? Mostly raw, but you do find nigiri made with cooked or seared fish No, always raw.
Cuisine Japanese Japanese
Is it Sushi? Yes No
Is it always fish? Yes – fish and other seafood such as shrimp, octopus and squid, but never meat No, sashimi can be thin slices of meat, like beef, horse, chicken, or frog.
Does it have rice? Yes No
Accompanied by Pickled ginger, wasabi and soy sauce Pickled ginger, wasabi and soy sauce
Garnished with Mostly nothing else; occasionally a sauce if the chef so fancies Daikon radish, sisho leaves, toasted nori (seaweed), at times other sauces
Eaten with Hands or chopsticks Chopsticks

Components

Nigirizushi, also known as nigiri, is created with spec

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Adblock
detector