How Do You Pronounce Pizza?

The word pizza is from Italian and the spelling is still Italian in many languages (in all languages using Latin alphabets that I know of), in Italian it’s pronounced /pittsa/ with a ‘long’ (or ‘double’ as I would call it in Norwegian) t sound.

What is pizza made of?

It is a savory dish of Italian origin that is made of dough and topped with cheese. It is served in a hot state and different varieties. Learn more about the word ‘pizza’, its origin, alternative forms, and usage from Wiktionary.

Why is pizza pronounced Pitza?

Well in Italian, it’s pronounced /ˈpit. tsa/, and when the word was borrowed into English, it kept that T sound. In the Italian alphabet, the /tts/ sound is written “zz”, so they spell it “pizza”, and when the word was borrowed into English, its spelling stayed the same too.

How do the British say police?

“Dibble” has been adopted as a British-English derogatory slang term for a police officer. Filth – Normally “The Filth”, UK, the police. Inspiration for the Irvine Welsh novel Filth. Fuzz – As “the fuzz”, used as slang for police officers; of unknown origin.

Why do Americans say pizza?

Pizza had similarities to a pie – with a crust, sliced triangle portions and its circular shape. Italian-Americans sold and popularized the pizzas, and the exotic dish picked up the English name “tomato pie”. Sometime thereafter the languages met in the middle to give us the term “pizza pie”.

How do you say pizza backwards?

Azzip Pizza on Twitter: ‘Yes, it’s pizza spelled backwards. It’s pronounced A-Zip, not Ah-zip or Ah-zeep.

What is the French word for pizza?

pizza à pâte épaisse nf.

How do you pronounce La pizza?

pizza

  1. pee. – sah.
  2. pi. – sa.
  3. pi. – zza.

What is pizza called in Italy?

A popular variant of pizza in Italy is Sicilian pizza (locally called sfincione or sfinciuni), a thick-crust or deep-dish pizza originating during the 17th century in Sicily: it is essentially a focaccia that is typically topped with tomato sauce and other ingredients.

What does R and P mean in police talk?

R&P. Rape & Pillage. R&P. Rhythm & Police (Dance Dance Revolution)

What is Popo slang for?

Photo: Dickson Lee. But one of the most popular slang terms for the local police today is “popo”. The word has its origins in 1980s southern California, where T-shirts bearing “PO” (“police officer”) worn by cops on bicycles would, with officers riding in pairs, spell out “POPO”.

Why are British police called the fuzz?

This was a 1960’s hippy expression and it referred to hair or lack of it. Hippies had long hair whereas, by comparison, policemen had only fuzz. Hence the nickname.

Is it wrong to pronounce ″pizza″ as ″peedtza″?

I was asked this question 11 years and 3 months ago.The video has been seen 100,000 times.When I mentioned the word ″pizza″ in the middle of a conversation, I was sarcastically criticized by my coworkers (in good fun, though).Given my accent, the way I said it was more along the lines of ″peedtza,″ with a small suggestion of that ″d″ that I was completely unaware of until they brought it to my attention.

They were claiming that the word should be pronounced ″peetsa,″ with no ″d″ or ″z″ in the pronunciation.Is it possible that my pronunciation is completely incorrect?Is it possible that it may be pronounced that way as well?

  • I’m not sure if it makes a difference, but because we’re in America, a comparison between British and American English seems appropriate.
  • I am open to constructive feedback, so please be as direct as possible!
  • tchrist126k48 gold badges are available.
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  • Posted on December 14, 2010 at 23:58 BeemerGuyBeemerGuy has 1,3498 gold badges to his credit.

16 silver badges are available.25 bronze medals were awarded.10 Definitely ″peetsa,″ both in British and American English, to be precise.There isn’t a proper alternate pronunciation for this word.You should not be concerned about your accent containing a minor ″d″ sound, since most people will be understanding of your situation.

  • response given on December 15, 2010 at 0:13 Jimi OkeJimi Oke26.7k2 gold badges Jimi OkeJimi Oke a total of 75 silver badges 105 bronze medals were awarded.
  • Although the term pizza is derived from Italian, and the spelling is still derived from Italian in many languages (including all languages employing Latin alphabets that I am aware of), in Italian, it is pronounced with a ″long″ (or ″double″ t sound, as I would refer to it in Norwegian) t sound.
  • I’m not sure why it has such a lengthy sound in English; perhaps it has something to do with the way English speakers usually pronounce the French final ″é″ as ″ay″ (for example, Café in French: /kafe/ in English: /kfe/).
  • Despite the fact that it is very lengthy, the long ″ee″ /i:/ sound is probably closer to the Italian /i/ sound than the short /I/ sound (″bin″ and so on).

In my opinion, it’s a bit ridiculous to correct someone’s pronunciation of a borrowed term when the Spanish version is really closer to the original than the English version.responded on December 15, 2010 at 12:07 p.m.The origins of the term ″pizza″ are a subject of much debate, however the majority of conjecture is that the word derives from a version of the Greek or Italian words for ″bread″ or ″pizza″ (″picea,″ ″pitta,″ and many more have been suggested).

  1. It appears that none of these languages include a real ″d″ sound, despite the fact that I am not familiar with any of these languages.
  2. I’ve only heard it pronounced with a ″t″ sound, and considering the possibility of its roots, I’d suggest that ″peetsa″ is the accurate pronunciation.
  3. response given on December 15, 2010 at 0:14 2 I reside in a region where the only dialects I frequently hear are South Midland, American Southern, and AAVE, which are all variants of the same dialect.
  4. ″Pete-sa″ and ″Pee-sa″ are two words I frequently hear.
  5. In all my years of listening, I have never heard it with a distinct ″d″ sound pronounced in it.
  • Food terms, on the other hand, are among the most vulnerable words in the English language to regionalization, so it wouldn’t surprise me if I heard variant spellings, and I doubt I’d make a big fuss about it if I did hear them.
  • There is one exception to this rule.
  • When I hear a New Englander use the word ″corn,″ I can’t help but think of Captain Kirk from Star Trek 2 and perform a poor Captain Kirk impersonation.
  • Khaaaaan!
  • T.E.D.18.2k1 gold badge was awarded on July 8, 2011 at 18:08 T.E.D.18.2k1 gold badge 37 silver badges were awarded.
  • 72 bronze medals were awarded.

1

British Slang: Your Guide to British Police Slang for the Telly Watcher

After binge-watching the full run of Endeavour, Inspector Morse, and Lewis, I came across a slew of unfamiliar phrases relating to British policing throughout my research.As a result, I felt it would be interesting and beneficial to compile a list.I’ve attempted to be as comprehensive as possible; if you see a term that I’ve missed, please let me know in the comments and I’ll add it to the list.Police Officer Bobby, so named because Sir Robert Peel established the first genuine police force in the United Kingdom – The Metropolitan Police Department – in 1861.

Rozzer is an officer of the law.Battenburg Marks – The markings on the side of a British police car, as well as slang for police officers.The Bill of Rights – The police.

  • It was initially used in a police drama that aired from 1984 to 2010, and it is now considered legitimate slang for police officers.
  • Bizzies — This is the police department.
  • Citizens who reported low-level crimes such as house burglary were said to have been ignored by the police in Merseyside because the officers were constantly ″too busy″ to assist them.
  • Another possible explanation is that the police are seen as ″busybodies,″ that is, they ask too many questions and interfer with the business of other people.
  • Two-tone sirens with blue flashing lights and blue flashing lights are used by British emergency vehicles.
  • The Thin Blue Line is represented by the color blue.

WPC is an abbreviation for Woman Police.Constable, obsolete — today’s ranks are no longer segregated by gender.Bluebottle is a slang term for the police in Cockney slang.Booked – To be taken into custody.Nicked – To be taken into custody.

  • Nick – The location of a police station.
  • The BTP (British Transport Police) is a police agency that is in charge of policing the railway system.
  • Candy cars are a slang word for police cars in the United Kingdom because its livery is a bright yellow and blue color scheme.
  • Chumps – An abbreviation for ″Completely Hopeless In Most Policing Situations,″ a slang word for Community Support Officers in the United Kingdom.
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A police officer is referred to as a cop, coppa, or copper.Dibble is the name of a fictitious police officer that appears in the Top Cat cartoon series.″Dibble″ has become a disparaging slang name for a police officer in the United Kingdom and the United States.

  1. Filth – In the United Kingdom, this is usually referred to as ″The Filth.″ Filth, a novel by Irvine Welsh, was inspired by this story.
  2. Fuzz — Also known as ″the fuzz,″ this slang term for police personnel has no documented origin.
  3. A police-comedy film titled ″Hot Fuzz″ was released in 2007, and the word was utilized in the title.
  4. grass – Cockney (English) rhyming slang for an informant in the police force: Copper is represented by the grasshopper.
  5. Hobby Bobby is another slang word for a member of the community police force.
  • Jam sandwich, also known as Jam Butty, is a type of police traffic car that is based on the now completely defunct historical color scheme – an overall white vehicle with a longitudinal red, or red and yellow, stripe on each side, and a longitudinal red, or red and yellow, stripe on the back.
  • The Metropolitan Police Department in London continues to utilize this uniform.
  • Silver automobiles with a red stripe running down the side.
  • The Police Department is represented by Old Bill.
  • Paddy Wagon is a type of police vehicle.
  • Because the majority of the police officers and convicts in Liverpool, United Kingdom, were of Irish descent, the neighborhood was given this name.

Peeler is an ancient name from the United Kingdom, but it may have persisted longer in Ireland than in Britain.It comes from Sir Robert Peel (see ″Bobby″).The Sweeney is a slang name used in the United Kingdom to refer to the Flying Squad of the Metropolitan Police Service of London.

  • Because of the way Cockneys speak, ″Sweeney Todd″ is pronounced as ″Flying Squad.″ In addition, there is a legendary television show and, more recently, a movie.
  • The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) was established in 1829 as a professional police force responsible for the whole metropolitan area of London, and it is still in operation today.
  • The Met is a shortened form of the phrase Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).
  • New Scotland Yard, Old Scotland Yard, and Older Scotland Yard — The location of the original Metropolitan Police headquarters, which has come to be known as a metonym for the police force in London.
  • Eventually, they were relocated to ‘New Scotland Yard.’ It has recently relocated, but the name has remained the same.

MI5 (Military Intelligence, Section 5) or the Security Service is another name for MI5.MI6 is essentially the domestic equivalent of the British intelligence agency (the James Bond ones).In Britain, the National Crime Agency (NCA) is the counterpart of the FBI, having been founded from the ashes of the Serious Organized Crime Agency.

DID YOU ENJOY THIS LIST? THEN CHECK OUT ANGLOTOPIA’S DICTIONARY OF BRITISH ENGLISH – BRIT SLANG FROM A TO ZED!

Anglotopia’s Dictionary of British English, 2nd Edition – Paperback Anglotopia’s Dictionary of British English, 2nd Edition – Paperback

Why Is Pizza Called Pie? All About The Other Name For Pizza

When it comes to recipes and other media, the terms pizza and pie are frequently used interchangeably.However, why would you name anything after another dish?What was the source of all this?You can learn all you need to know about it right here.

So, why is pizza referred to as pie?When Italian immigrants came in the United States in the late 1800s, they referred to pizza as ″pie.″ Pizza was comparable to a pie in that it had a crust, was divided into triangle parts, and had a round appearance.The pizzas were marketed and promoted by Italian-Americans, and the unusual food gained the English term ″tomato pie″ as a result of their efforts.

  • It was some time after that that the languages came together in the center, giving us the name ″pizza pie.″ It may be a well-known term to you, or it could be something you’ve only recently heard…
  • ″When a moon catches your eye like a giant pizza pie, that’s amore,″ Dean Martin sang in his 1953 hit song ″Amore,″ and I’m sure you can recall the reference to a pizza pie in the song.
  • Let’s take a look at how we arrived to this point.

Where Did It Come From?

It’s quite likely that the cuisine originated in New York, where a large number of Italians settled and introduced the dish.New York is home to the world’s earliest documented accounts of the term, as well as the world’s first pizzeria.One of the oldest documented usage may be found in an article published on December 6th, 1903, in the New-York Tribune.Many New Yorkers would have lumped the new, strange food in with pies, and the journalist has followed their lead – ″the Italians have devised a new sort of pie″ – in his article.

This was known as a ″pomidore pizza″ back then, with pomodori being Italian for tomato, as you can see in the picture.For whatever reason, whether it was a choice to coin an English title for the meal or simply because the two dishes were so similar, it is easy to understand how the phrase ″tomato pie″ came to be used.Gennaro Lombardi, sometimes known as the ″Father of American Pizza,″ was a well-known person at the time.

  • In 1897, he opened a grocery store in Manhattan and began selling tomato pies to office employees during their lunch breaks.
  • He sold pizza by the slice and wrapped it up for takeout, and the establishment quickly became a popular and handy lunch place.
  • And it was from there that the city of New York began its obsession for sliced pizza.
  • This restaurant, which opened in 1905 and is widely considered to be the world’s first pizza, is renowned as the first pizzeria in the United States.
  • It is currently owned and operated by his grandson, and the pizza is still baked in a classic coal-fired brick oven.
  • Although it is a frequent misperception that the word pizza is synonymous with the word pie, this is not the case.

Pizza is a term that is solely used to describe pizza in Italy, and not to describe any other pie-like food.More information on the Italian origins may be found further down in the article.

What Does The Word Pie Mean When Referring To Pizza?

Pizza pie is just pizza and does not relate to a particular form of pizza — even thin crust pizza can be referred to as a pie in this context.However, when it comes to referring to the amount of pizza, it does make a difference.If you’re talking about a complete pizza, the phrase ″pie″ or ″pizza pie″ is frequently used to refer to the entire pizza.As contrast to a single piece, which is more commonly referred to as a ″slice.″ A pie is frequently used in New York, where pizza is a term that refers to an unknown item, similar to the way that water is used to refer to an unknown product.

You wouldn’t order water; you’d order a bottle of water, instead.In the same way, you might order a pie or a piece of pizza.This essentially translates to ″a pizza pie″ or ″a pizza slice,″ depending on your preference.

  • The phrase ″a pizza″ or ″a piece of pizza″ does not make any sense in that context.
  • Some instances include ordering pizza – ″I ordered two full pies last week, but only a slice today″ – and referring to it as ″I ordered two whole pies last week, but only a slice today.″ Use it as an additional noun to describe a complete pizza, such as ″I baked a 14-inch pizza in my oven, and it turned out to be a wonderfully cooked pie.″

Who Calls Pizza A Pie?

The term ″pie″ is only used in conjunction with pizza in the United States, and only in select places.Older generations of Italian-Americans are more likely to use the whole sentence than younger generations.As a slang phrase for pizza, the term pie is now more commonly used on its own, as in ″I’ll take two pies to go.″ Even within the United States, there are variations in usage, with the north east coast, notably New York, having the most popular usage.Some people in the United States have never even heard of the word.

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Pizza pie never really took off outside of the United States, which may explain why people are perplexed when they hear the term ″pie″ while discussing pizzas, because a pie is often made with pastry.

Does Pizza Mean Pie in Italian?

Contrary to popular belief, the word pizza does not translate as ″pie″ in Italian.Pizza is a distinct entity and a distinct food in and of itself; hence, in Italy, you would not use the term pizza to describe an actual pie.Pies with sweet or savory fillings are described by various words, such as torta or crostata, however the name pizza would never be used to describe such a pie.The term ″pizza″ refers to exactly one type of meal, and it is that dish.

So Where Did Pizza Get Its Name?

Due to the countless influences that language has absorbed over the years, the roots of pizza have been confused, resulting in several plausible sources.When it comes to pizza, ″pitta″ is most likely associated with Greece – the circular flatbread that can occasionally be topped with other ingredients.The Ancient Greek term ″pikte,″ which meant ″fermented pastry,″ was transformed into the Latin word ″picta,″ which eventually passed into the hands of the Italians.Perhaps it came from the term ″pizzo,″ which means ″moutful″ in Italian and is of Lombardic origin, which they brought with them when they conquered Italy in the 6th century.

According to a Latin letter dating back to 997 AD, the earliest recorded use of the term ″pizza″ was in a statement that the bishop of the Italian town Gaeta was to receive duodecim pizze or ″twelve pizzas″ on Christmas Day and Easter Sunday, respectively.

Other Pizza Names Around The World

Pizza is, without a doubt, the most popular meal on the planet.The basic and staple dish from Naples has spread around the world in a variety of forms.The phrase ″pizza″ is regularly heard and understood throughout the majority of the world.Except for a few minor modifications that are extremely similar to the original pronunciation, such as how it is spelled or spoken, the pronunciation is very identical to the original pronunciation.

When you order bánh pizza in Vietnam, you are actually ordering cake or pie, thus you can see the effect of the United States on their culinary traditions.

History And The Use Of The Words

Pizza In The United States

So, while the term pizza is a very old word, it has stayed firmly rooted in Italian culture until quite recently.The first stores and pizzerias opened in New York and New Jersey in the early 1900s, but it wasn’t until the Second World War that the popularity of pizza fully took off.Soldiers from the United States stationed in Italy sent back stories of the tomato and cheese pie they had had while on duty.It was the combined effect of returning troops and Italian immigrants in the United States that was responsible for bringing pizza into the public consciousness.

Between the late 1800s through the 1940s, the majority of pizza was consumed by Italian immigrants and their descendants.After World War II, it became more commonly available for consumption.The deep dish pizza from Chicago was first served in 1943.

  • When it was released in 1953, it became successful enough to be used in Dean Martin’s Amore.
  • In 1960, it was featured in a Popeye the Sailor episode.
  • The rest, as they say, is history, and pizza has grown to become one of the most popular foods in the United States, thanks to the proliferation of pizza chains and fast food restaurants.
  • Pizza Hut and Domino’s were formed in 1958 and 1960, respectively, to become the largest food-service corporations in the world.
  • According to research, 13 percent of Americans, or around 1 in every 8 people, consume pizza on any given day.

Pizza Vs Pizza Pie

The Google Books Ngram of the two sentences is depicted in the following chart.This graph depicts the annual count of the words ″pizza″ and ″pizza pie″ found in printed sources from 1800 to the present.As you can see, pizza pie has never been quite as popular as it is now.It saw a minor increase in the 1990s, but has recently begun to decline once more.

It’s fascinating to observe the surge in popularity of pizza immediately following the outbreak of World War II.

Where Did Pizza Come From?

Many countries have staked claims to the invention of pizza.With the Chinese, the Middle East, and Europe all selling circular flat bread-like dishes with cheese and toppings, it’s no surprise that they’re popular.However, the pizza that we are familiar with today originated in Napoli, where it served as a working-class lunch for the people who resided there.Given that Napoli is an industrial port, it is not surprising that the wives of port employees and street sellers would bake tomato pizzas for the sea workers, which is where the term ″marinara″ originated.

These could be quickly folded up and eaten without the use of a knife and fork.The toppings were kept to a minimum in order for the meal to be affordable, straightforward, and likely to last longer.It was in 1889 when Margherita of Savoy, the Queen of Italy, traveled to Naples to sample the local cuisine.

  • Raffaele Esposito, a pizzaiolo from Naples, made a pizza using tomato, mozzarella, and basil to represent the country’s flag.
  • It was a rousing success, and the Margherita pizza was created.

Is Pizza American Or Italian?

The origins of the pizza that we know today can most definitely be traced back to Italy.A basic marinara or margarita, or else whatever ingredients were accessible to working class Neapolitans, topped with a simple garnish.And this was only the beginning of the enormous diversity that can now be found all over the planet.However, it was after it was taken to America that it was re-invented and then re-exported all over the globe.

Much like other items, such as hamburgers and other meals, the United States elevated it to a higher level by adding more toppings and establishing larger corporations.So, while Italy is credited with the invention of pizza, the United States has developed a distinct style that is distinct from the rest of the world.

So Is Pizza Considered A Pie?

They have several characteristics in common – both have a crust, are spherical, and are sliced into slices – as well as significant differences.Despite the fact that pastry is generally a fundamental component of pies, there are certain problems in the concept.The general view is that pizzas are not technically pies, but that term has stayed because it is easy to remember.The majority of sources suggest that the phrase is becoming more outdated and less prevalent, with elder Italian-American generations being the most frequent users.

It all depends on where you are and what you’re doing when you call something a pie.The term ″pie″ would be easily understood if you were on the east coast of the United States.It is possible that you will not get what you asked for if you are in another country, particularly outside of the United States, because a pizza is not often regarded a pie there.

Related Questions

Was there a significant difference between a pizza and an Italian pie?They are both made of the same ingredients.When ordering pizza, the term ″pizza pie″ is frequently used to refer to the amount of pizza being ordered.A complete pizza is referred to as a ″whole pie,″ whereas a slice of pizza is referred to as a slice of pizza.

This is most typically encountered in the city of New York.Do you know what the distinction is between tomato pie and pizza?Depending on where you live, this may be the case.

  • Although tomato pie is often made with a thick, rectangular, chewy foundation, similar to a focaccia, and is topped in excellent crushed tomatoes because it is the primary component, there are variations.
  • An optional garnish of hard cheese, such as Parmesan or another Romano cheese, and olive oil can be added to complete the dish.
  • Pizza comes in a variety of shapes and sizes, but it is often spherical, has a bigger crust, and has more toppings, such as mozzarella and pepperoni, than other types of food.
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pizza – English-French Dictionary WordReference.com

  • Voir également:
    • The words pitying, pityingly, pivoting, pixel, pixie, pixilated, pizza, pizza delivery, pizza parlour, pizza restaurant, pizzeria, pizzicato, pizzle, and pj’s are all variations of the words pitying, pityingly, pivot, pivotal, and pivoting. The words pitying, pityingly, pivot, pivotal, and pivoting are all variations of the word pivot.
    • Recherches récentes:
    • Voir tout
    WordReference English-French Dictionary © 2022:
    Principales traductions
    Anglais Français
    pizza nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (food) pizza nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
      The students order two pizzas every Friday night.
      Les étudiants commandent deux pizzas chaque vendredi soir.

    WordReference English-French Dictionary 2022: WordReference English-French Dictionary

    Formes composées
    Anglais Français
    cheese pizza nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (pizza: topped with cheese) pizza au fromage nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
      I don’t want pepperoni, mushrooms or sausage; I just want a cheese pizza.
    deep-dish pizza nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. US (deep-pan pizza, thick-crust pizza) pizza à pâte épaisse nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
      Chicago is known for its delicious deep-dish pizzas.
    pepperoni pizza nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (pizza with spicy meat) pizza au pepperoni nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
    pizza chef nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (cook specializing in pizzas) pizzaiolo nmnom masculin: s’utilise avec les articles ″le″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″un″. Ex: garçon – nm > On dira ″le garçon″ ou ″un garçon″.
    pizza crust nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (crisp pastry at edge of a pizza) croûte d’une pizza nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
       (familier) trottoir nmnom masculin: s’utilise avec les articles ″le″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″un″. Ex: garçon – nm > On dira ″le garçon″ ou ″un garçon″.
      Mon père ne mange jamais le trottoir de ses pizzas.
    pizza joint nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. US, slang (pizzeria, pizza restaurant) pizzeria nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
      Your mother and I met at the pizza joint downtown, that’s why we always bring you kids here.
    pizza maker nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (chef who makes pizzas) pizzaiolo nmnom masculin: s’utilise avec les articles ″le″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″un″. Ex: garçon – nm > On dira ″le garçon″ ou ″un garçon″.
      Quel fabuleux pizzaiolo, il crée des pizzas divines!
    pizza pie nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. US (pizza) pizza nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
    pizza sauce nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (tomato-based pizza topping) sauce à pizza nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
    pizza slice nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (cut portion of pizza) part de pizza nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
       (Can) pointe de pizza nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
      Si personne ne veut la dernière part de pizza, je la prends!
    pizza topping nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (food added to a pizza) garniture de pizza, garniture pour pizza nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles ″la″, ″l’″ (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), ″une″. Ex: fille – nf > On dira ″la fille″ ou ″une fille″. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un ″e″ à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira ″une petite fille″.
      You can use almost anything as a pizza topping – sausage, green peppers, and even pineapple.
    ‘pizza’ également trouvé dans ces entrées: Dans la description anglaise: Français :
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    Improve Your English Pronunciation

    • Break the word ″pizza″ down into sounds by doing the following: + – speak it out loud and emphasize the sounds until you can consistently make them
    • Make a recording of yourself saying ‘pizza’ in full sentences, then watch and listen to yourself. You’ll be able to identify and correct your faults rather quickly
    • Look for pronunciation courses on YouTube to learn how to say ″pizza.″
    • Concentrate on a single accent: combining several accents, especially for beginners, may be quite confusing, so choose one accent (for example, US or UK) and stay with it.

    To further improve your English pronunciation, we suggest you do the following:

    • Practice reducing the number of words and sentences you use: in some countries, reducing the number of words and sentences you use is considered informal, but in the United States, it is completely normal and considered part of everyday conversation (for example, what are you going to do this weekend versus what are you going to do this weekend). More instances may be found in the words going to and want to.
    • Make an effort to improve your intonation: emphasis, rhythm, and intonation patterns are difficult to acquire in English, but they are essential for people to comprehend what you are saying. It is the vehicle through which the mood, attitude, and emotion are expressed. Investigate YouTube, where you’ll find innumerable videos pertaining to this subject
    • Subscribe to one or more English language instruction channels on YouTube: it’s completely free, and it covers the most important aspects of the English language and culture. Check out Rachel’s English and English for further information. With Jennifer, to mention a few examples.

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